The Discovery Sport has been racking up the miles on various holiday trips, and it's passed every practical test with flying colours
Allan Muir
21 June 2016

Such has been the demand for our Discovery Sport’s services in recent weeks that I’ve hardly seen it — a situation I’m far from happy about.

Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde took it to North Somerset for a weekend that involved lots of mud and slippery fields, then Steve Cropley borrowed it for a week-long holiday in Cornwall with his other half, and editorial chief Jim Holder nabbed it for a hectic weekend of family activities in and around London.

The What Car? road testers pilfered it for almost two weeks for, among other things, a comparison with a Jaguar F-Pace and a BMW X3 (which it won).

And right this minute, it’s back in Cornwall with editorial assistant Doug Revolta, who wanted something to transport a double bass and other musical instruments on a week-long trip.

Each time the car returns to my hands, I feel a real sense of relief — stronger than I ever expected. Not only am I a confirmed fan of the way the Discovery Sport drives and its comfort levels, but it’s also becoming clear just how versatile and downright useful it is.

The Discovery Sport is proving to be the ideal vehicle for a multitude of tasks. I’ve been putting the car’s practicality to the test in a number of ways.

First, I was pleased to find that with all the rear seats folded down, my pushbike will fit in the load bay with ease, without needing to remove the front wheel.

That wasn’t the case when I tried the same thing in a Dacia Duster the previous week.

I also used the car to lug the rotting remains of a demolished garden shed to a recycling centre — a task that made far more of a mess of the interior than expected, despite my best efforts to protect it with old sheets.

Black marks on the beige rooflining gave some cause for concern, but they sponged off easily. The rest of the load bay scrubbed up well, too.

Only a couple of small scratches on the plastics remain as reminders of my cruel treatment of the car.

Some spiders also seem to have found a more upmarket place to live, judging by the cobwebs…

SD card care

A little care is required with the sat-nav’s SD card. I popped it out of its slot without realising, simply by dropping a sunglasses case into the cubby between the front seats, where the ‘media hub’ is located.

Despite a warning message on the multimedia screen, it took me a minute to figure out why the sat-nav wasn’t working and put it right.

Land Rover Discovery Sport TD4 180 HSE auto

List price £39,400 Price as tested £42,222 Economy 32.9mpg Faults None Expenses None

Our Verdict

The Land Rover Discovery Sport
The new Land Rover Discovery Sport is the successor to the Freelander

The Freelander's replacement goes big on prettiness and packaging, and as a result becomes the class leader

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Comments
11

21 June 2016
It's funny people who dislike this car tend to knock the interior for being too bland. But actually this car is surely what 4x4 enthusiats want? A capable and practical offroader with go anywhere ability.

21 June 2016
Personally I think the interior is well judged. Ergonomics, comfort and practicality are what matters. The poor economy is a much more valid concern - 33mpg really is bad for a new engine, no better than the old Ford unit.

21 June 2016
Hi Allan - how about compared to your previous Golf R estate (also a spacious 4x4). I ask because in our household I am pushing to get a Golf R Estate but the rest of the family fancy a Disco Sport! Extra 2 seats aside, we don't go off road (the odd muddy field event) but the Golf would be more fun for me on my own but the kids like a higher view!!

 

 

 

21 June 2016
Please buy the Golf. Just tell your family that diesel isn't acceptable anymore.

21 June 2016
No nasty particulates

 

 

 

21 June 2016
Take the Golf with the de-badge option, have it in grey, and people won't think you have loads-o-money, just a "boring" Golf Estate. Q car. But be careful with speed humps. I almost bought a GT Estate, they are cavernous.

21 June 2016
I would certainly suggest this is the most complete vehicle Land Rover produce at the moment, striking the balance between style, price and practicality.

A friend recently bought one after his good experienced with his previous petrol Evoke. Whilst he loves the space and practicality he is seriously considering outing the car because of the diesel engine (yes, it is the later JLR unit).

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

21 June 2016
What 'Sport' is being referred to in the name exactly?

21 June 2016
Dogging! lol

 

 

It's all about the twisties........

21 June 2016
So shouldn't they call it the Discover Dogging?

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