Volkswagen will buy back or fix 475,000 cars in the US, and all owners are set to get compensation of up to $10,000
25 October 2016

Volkswagen has been given approval for its $14.7 billion (around £11bn) settlement with owners of cars in the US affected by the emissions scandal.

The settlement money, which is the largest sum in US history, will be used to compensate some 475,000 drivers. Owners can choose between getting the software fix or selling their car back to VW. They will also get additional compensation payments of between $5100 to $10,000, regardless of which choice they make.

The final approval follows comments from US District Judge Charles Breyer last week that indicated he planned to approve the deal.

No change for Europe

Volkswagen continues to draw criticism from political figures as it stands by its decision to not offer compensation to European customers, despite the mounting pressure to do so.

Spokesmen from Volkswagen have claimed that compensation is not necessary in the UK and the rest of Europe because the fix is less extensive and customers will, therefore, have their cars back soon after they have been recalled.

A further $2bn (around £1.5bn) will be put into the development of zero-emissions vehicles, such as hydrogen fuel cell cars and electric vehicles, while $2.7bn (around £2bn) will be put into environmental mitigation.

In the UK, it was recently revealed that Volkswagen offered to cover the cost of government retesting of vehicle emissions. However, the offer was only extended to Volkswagen Group vehicles, rather than all of the cars tested from various manufacturers, which reportedly cost a total of £2m. 

The results of the retesting scheme revealed that only Volkswagen Group products used the so-called ‘defeat devices’, the discovery of which sparked the emissions scandal.

VW also reached a "partial settlement" with 44 US states last month for a total of $603m.

In a further move, the states of Maryland, New York and Massachusetts are all filing lawsuits against the manufacturer, accusing it of violating state environmental laws and defrauding regulators, according to ReutersThese lawsuits would be in addition to the $14.7bn compensation package.

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Comments
18

28 June 2016
Huge compensation for US owners who paid a lot less for their cars in the first place. Else where, we get the square root of buggar all.
As an owner of a couple of diesels, I'm wondering if the fuel will be seen by future generations in the way we view luminous paint, asbestos and playing with mercury.

28 June 2016
At least Part 1.

19 July 2016
fadyady wrote:

At least Part 1.

How's the Golf? PMSL


26 October 2016
fadyady wrote:

At least Part 1.

Some environmental transport group claims hundreds of thousands of people are dying through small turbo petrol engines high levels of particulate emissions. The higher temperatures, internal pressures required to give performance lead to the production of particulates outside of test procedures. VW is the first manufacturer to commit itself to fitting particulate filters to its TSI engines next year. Supposedly EU emission rules will demand all petrol cars have them under new rules coming into force in 2018. The environmental group claims the EU were warned in 2013 the introduction of small turbo petrol cars would cause emission problems, it is claimed that the fitting of particulate filters to petrol engines will reduce their efficiency and performance.

29 June 2016
"In the UK, it was recently revealed that Volkswagen offered to cover the cost of government retesting of vehicle emissions. However, the offer was only extended to Volkswagen Group vehicles, rather than all of the cars tested from various manufacturers, which reportedly cost a total of £2 million." I would have thought that went without saying, there is no reason for VW to pay for other makes of cars to be tested, that would not make sense.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

19 July 2016
Chequebook and not buy Audi ,VW,Porche,Seat and Skoda they ae lying scumbagsand I certainly will not buy from them again their credability and status has tanked so will buy JLR ,BMW and Mercedes in future.They try and state how economical their cars are ,might just as well say they do not use any fuel at all as they achieve 40 to 505 of what they claim,pretty well -hit.

20 July 2016
Ski Kid wrote:

Chequebook and not buy Audi ,VW,Porche,Seat and Skoda they ae lying scumbagsand I certainly will not buy from them again their credability and status has tanked so will buy JLR ,BMW and Mercedes in future.They try and state how economical their cars are ,might just as well say they do not use any fuel at all as they achieve 40 to 505 of what they claim,pretty well -hit.

1. Explain what the VAG group have been lying about to UK customers. You certainly didn't buy your vehicle based on it's NOx figure, nobody I've spoken to had ever heard of a NOx figure prior to the USA scandal. You bought your car based on Co2 output, are you saying VW have incorrectly stated CO2 output?

2. If they have lied to you that's against the law so it's simply a case of claiming against the garage you purchased your cars from. Are you going to take them to court? after all if they've lied to you as you say then then you're going to win your case.

3. You say VAG claim incorrect fuel consumption figures. What are the fuel consumption figures claimed by JLR, BMW and Merc who you're now going to purchase from, and how do they differ from real-world figures?

26 October 2016
scotty5 wrote:
Ski Kid wrote:

Chequebook and not buy Audi ,VW,Porche,Seat and Skoda they ae lying scumbagsand I certainly will not buy from them again their credability and status has tanked so will buy JLR ,BMW and Mercedes in future.They try and state how economical their cars are ,might just as well say they do not use any fuel at all as they achieve 40 to 505 of what they claim,pretty well -hit.

....2. If they have lied to you that's against the law so it's simply a case of claiming against the garage you purchased your cars from. Are you going to take them to court? after all if they've lied to you as you say then then you're going to win your case.

..

Regarding point 2, Go onto the Slater and Gordon as they trying to put together a class action against the VW Group. (They're know more about it than Scotty5)

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

20 July 2016
If VW have used cheat devices to pass tests for car approvals surely that's against something ? doesn't have to be written like F1 regulations to prove they've done wrong ? not necessarily consuers but at least government tests..

20 July 2016
Two of my ex-motor trade colleagues tell me that residuals of VWs don't seem to have been affected in the UK. As scotty5 says, nobody has been buying cars based on NOx emissions here, they are more interested in mpg (and I don't believe that Americans are interested in NOx either otherwise they wouldn't drive pick ups in their thousands). America would love to cobble a big European manufacturer that threatens its home manufacturers/jobs etc. I have only driven one make of car (and I've driven most) which returned better real life mpg than the VW cars so what would the UK compensation be for? That people were sold cars with cheat devices on relevant only to a US market test? Do people feel lied to? In which case we could sue most manufacturers if you compare the reality of owning their cars with the sales brochure claims. Does that Toyota Auris you bought really offer the unrivalled driving pleasure you were promised? Does that Ford ecoboost engine offer diesel rivalling economy in the real world? Has that crossover given you the ability to truly explore the great outdoors? The whole diselgate thing has left a sour taste no doubt but let's get some perspective here.

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