Currently reading: Tesla will not launch any new models in 2022
Elon Musk confirms that the company will prioritise increasing capacity over launching the Cybertruck and Roadster

Tesla will not launch any new models until 2023 at the earliest, as it focuses its efforts on overcoming the supply chain crisis and scaling up its global production capacity. 

The move means the long-awaited Roadster sports car – the launch of which has already been subject to repeated delays – and the radical Cybertruck pick up will not go into production this year, as had earlier been suggested.

"If we were to introduce new vehicles, our total vehicle output would decrease," CEO Elon Musk said during the firm's 2021 earnings call, which came as Tesla reported a near doubling of vehicle deliveries as demand for its Model 3 and Model Y soared.

"We will not be introducing new vehicles this year," Musk confirmed.

Launching a new car in 2021 "wouldn't have boosted output", Musk said, emphasising that the additional resources that must be diverted to the launch of a new model would restrict the firm's ability to produce other models at capacity.

He did say that the firm will begin implementing tooling to support production of the Cybertruck and Roadster in 2022, with the aim of launching them "hopefully next year". 

Notably, Tesla only recently withdrew mentions of a 2022 launch date from the online order page for the Cybertruck, though is still taking fully refundable £100 deposits from interested customers in the UK, and promises they will be able to configure their vehicle "as production nears". 

Musk's remarks also dampen anticipation for Tesla's long-promised 'sub-$25,000' (£17,000) electric hatchback, which was expected to launch in 2022 or 2023 as an autonomous-capable rival to C-segment EVs including the Volkswagen ID 3 and Renault Mégane E-tech. 

Indeed, when asked about progress on this entry-level model, Musk said: "We're not currently working on the $25,000 car. We have enough on our plate - too much, really." 

Tesla will instead focus on ramping up production capacity at its California, Texas, Shanghai and (eventual) Berlin vehicle factories throughout 2022, following a year in which it achieved record vehicle deliveries despite output being restricted by the supply chain crisis.

Musk also said the firm's new Optimus robot is arguably Tesla's most important product in development, given it has "the potential to be more significant than the vehicle business". 

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scrap 27 January 2022

The Roadster is a niche offer. The Cybertruck is, in my view, seriously misjudged. A cheaper, entry level Tesla would need to succeed on much tighter margins. No mention of the semi which, according to Mercedes and other 'legacy' truck makers, physically impossible.  

So, no surprise these projects are delayed, but the S and X are now getting old (facelifts will only get you so far) and even the 3 is now very familiar. When and how do Tesla replace these core models?

lambo58 27 January 2022

Cybertruck, seriously misjudged? I think your judgement is out by some margin. Its had a million preorders so far and increasing. As for the semi being physically impossible. Musk will have the last laugh. Mecedes would throw shade at Tesla. A company that didnt even exist 15 years ago has broken every convention and become on paper at least more valuable than any so called legacy company making cars.

S and X models are being wound down now as second generation models are being developed in secret. The so called delays in getting everything to market is just supply problems from outside contributors which every car company in the world is suffering from, not just the most successful EV manufacturer in the world.

scrap 27 January 2022

A Tesla pre order is a zero risk punt. Might as well reserve a place in the queue and then ask for a refund down the line if you change your mind. Or are a penniless fanboy. The reason I think it's misjudged is that Tesla is seen as a friendly face of the future - its designs are non-threatening and not particularly aggressive. The Cybertruck's robocop styling looks fit for a more dystopian world. It will repel as many as it attracts imo.

Also, of course, they've lost first mover advantage. The Rivian pick up has been attracting very positive reviews and, in my view, is pitched exactly where Tesla would want to be.

lambo58 27 January 2022

There is little or no point debating any points about Tesla to you as you will throw shade at them no matter what.

The Rivian pickup is the only vehicle they have pitched and selling and it's far easier when you concentrate on just one model. Musk is juggling loads of different projects at the same time and has already said he has too many balls in the air. The so called first mover advantage does little to alter the fact that the cybertruck  is the most talked about vehicle of it's kind in the world, even from boss like you. Time will tell.

scrap 27 January 2022

'S and X being wound down as second gen models being developed in secret.'

 

Do you have a source for this? The S has just received a major update, the X will be next I assume. I am not aware of new models in development.

Torque Stear 27 January 2022
scrap wrote:

'S and X being wound down as second gen models being developed in secret.'

 

Do you have a source for this? The S has just received a major update, the X will be next I assume. I am not aware of new models in development.

Tesla works a little differently to most manufacturers, the Model S sold today has very little in common with the one released in 2013. They bascially continously improve the vehicle and throw in improvements when they are ready rather than having yearly models or facelifts.

The Plaid and Long range are 150-200kg lighter than the 2020 model cars they repaced due to a new battery pack which actually has less energy in it as the cars are lighter and don't need as much energy to go the same distance. 

We know that Tesla was going to sell the Plaid + but canned it to avoid canabalising sales from the Plaid and long range. As the 4680 cells become availible in the next year expect the Model S & X to pick up this cell and its associated structural battery. Probably unlikely that they will be substantially restyled as part of this.

Model X may be replaced by a Cybertruck SUV, Model S may be replaced by something based on the Roadster. Both have massive profit margins at the moment so they won't be keen to stop selling them.

lambo58 27 January 2022

Yes.

bol 27 January 2022

All makes sense, but I'm disappointed that the C segment car isn't under development. I would have liked to replace my Model 3 with one in a couple of years' time.  

With regard to quality, I'm starting to think that the comments are as ill informed as the old Skoda jokes. My car has been faultless in build and reliability, and that seems to be consistent with the experiences of others who received 2021 cars. Not to say some of the earlier ones weren't a bit ropey. 

lambo58 27 January 2022

Full agreement, we just took delivery of our 2nd model 3 after the lease ran out on the first and the difference in the quality is incredible to say the least. Shut lines and general build are even more solid and the paint faultless.

All the so called naysayers I suspect have never even sat in one let alone driven one...

Scribbler 27 January 2022

The growing pains of a young car company. Equally, though, Tesla now has many different constituencies to please. There will be disappointment among many Tesla fans that the new models promised won't be going into production this year. This comes on top of a feeling that Tesla is going in the wrong direction for refreshing the designs of its existing models.

The vertical integration of Tesla might start to work against it because it jealously guards servicing and repairs of its cars. This presents a number of challenges for existing owners and buyers of older used Teslas, especially in the US where the right to repair is a big issue. It is going to get interesting as more and more older Teslas move out of warranty.

Further, if Tesla is putting all of its focus on production, this might be diverting resources and all available parts away from the servicing and support parts of the organisation. Finally, there are no signs that increased production volumes and productivity are improving Tesla manufacturing defect rates.

Boris9119 27 January 2022

No argument with that Scribbler as an ex-pat living in Florida. I fully understand and support Musk's rationale, it makes total business sense in the short term. As a Porsche fanboy, and serial owner, I applaud the impact Tesla has had on the legacy manufacturers, Porsche included.

Scribbler 27 January 2022

I don't disgree with you. However, two observations:

  • To borrow a phrase, it now looks as if Tesla can't walk and chew gum at the same time.
  • At times, Musk has been very critical of the "legacy" car industry, especially about apparent "inertia". To be fair to many of thse organisations, it can be challenging to completely overhaul your business while at the same maintaining production (chip shortage permitting) of existing models.
Torque Stear 27 January 2022
Scribbler wrote:

I don't disgree with you. However, two observations:

  • To borrow a phrase, it now looks as if Tesla can't walk and chew gum at the same time.
  • At times, Musk has been very critical of the "legacy" car industry, especially about apparent "inertia". To be fair to many of thse organisations, it can be challenging to completely overhaul your business while at the same maintaining production (chip shortage permitting) of existing models.

The other way to look at it is that Tesla are ruthless and confident.

The legacy auto route would be to roll out lots of new car models because it reduces risk associated with one model running out of demand. On the earnings call they were very clear that working on the supply chain issues and scaling up the factories got the most cars out of the door and they were confident that they could sell 2 million 3 and Y.

I also suspect that they aren't too concerned about being the first EV into a given segment, the Y wasn't the first medium SUV/Crossover EV on the market but it rapidly swept past everybody else simply because it is 1: Good and 2: Scaled up so much quicker.

lambo58 27 January 2022

I agree with most of what you have said except for the last part. We have just taken delivery of our 2nd model 3 after the lease expired on our first and the build quality is now on a different level in just about every way. As Tesla iron out the kinks of being the startup new boy on the block they are quickly becoming a higher quality product too. My wife and I are delighted and our experience is like the majority of buyers who have made the model 3 the biggest selling ev in the world in just 5 years. 

Scribbler 27 January 2022

I am sure that individual Tesla owners can point to improvements and better overall manufacturing quality. However, organisations that measure and monitor manfuacturing quality and other data about new cars tend to care only about averages and trends over time.

To be fair, there is string dataa that Tesla has learned a lot about manufactuirng quality over the last 10 years. However, give the price points of its cars, I think that it still has more to do for perceived manufacturing quality.