Tesla is conducting a voluntary recall of all 90,000 Model S electric cars because of a seatbelt failure in Europe
Darren Moss
23 November 2015

Tesla has confirmed it is voluntarily recalling every Model S worldwide to fix a potential issue with its seatbelts.

The global recall, which is understood to affect some 90,000 vehicles, is the result of one customer reporting a fault with the front seatbelt on a Model S. In a statement, the California-based company said: "Tesla recently found a Model S in Europe with a front seat belt that was not properly connected to the outboard lap pretensioner. This vehicle was not involved in a crash and there were no injuries.

"This is the only customer vehicle we know of with this condition. We have since inspected the seat belts in over 3000 vehicles spanning the entire range of Model S production and found no issues."

Speaking to news service Bloomberg, a Tesla spokesperson said: "In early November, a customer sitting in the front passenger seat turned to speak with occupants in the rear and the seat belt became disconnected.

“The seat belt is anchored to the outboard lap pretensioner through two anchor plates that are bolted together. The bolt that was supposed to tie the two anchors together wasn’t properly assembled.”

It is understood that all versions of the Model S produced since the model's launch in 2012, and including the most recent addition, the P85D, are subject to the voluntary recall. The car recently gained autonomous driving functionality thanks to Tesla's latest wireless update.

A Tesla spokesperson confirmed to Autocar that the short safety check would take from three to six minutes. Customers are being contacted and advised to book appointments to have their vehicles checked.

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24 November 2015
An actual bad new story about the Elon Marvel.

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