Subaru has released a single image of its upcoming hot BRZ STI model, which is due to be revealed in early June

The Subaru BRZ STI is coming, with carbonfibre aero parts and the possibility of more power from its boxer engine. 

Subaru hinted at the car on social media, simply captioning a photo of the BRZ with STI-branded carbonfibre rear wing with 'Stay tuned…6/8/17. #STI'. 

The first part of the text may hint at a higher state of tune for the BRZ’s 2.0-litre naturally aspirated flat-four engine. Subaru’s only other STI-badged model is the WRX STI, successor to the Impreza WRX STI.

The standard WRX sports saloon, which isn't available in the UK, produces 268bhp, where the WRX STI produces 305bhp; an increase of almost 14%, thanks to direct injection, turbocharging and Dual Active Valve Control.

The standard WRX's engine is a developed version of the BRZ's, so it’s possible that the changes would be carried over to the BRZ STI, or alternatively, the WRX STI's 2.5-litre engine will be shared with the BRZ STI. 

The standard BRZ weighs 1231kg, with 55% of its weight over the rear wheels and 45% over the fronts.

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Subaru BRZ

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The BRZ costs from £25,040, so the STI model could well cost more than £30,000. In this price bracket, it would have the Lotus Elise to contend with.

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Comments
11

31 May 2017
Pretty please

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

31 May 2017
xxxx wrote:

Pretty please

I think they said at launch that there isn't enough room for a turbocharger.

They didn't mention a supercharger, though... ;-)

31 May 2017
I don't understand the point of turbos for he following reasons:

too much power low down = Traction control overload and throttle cut.
Throttle turned into a switch instead of a pedal that you can never adjust to feed in power.
No revs = so turn power delivery into diesel mode (7000rpm is better fun than 5000rpm.
Sluggish throttle response as turbo spools up.
Heavy fuel consumption when spooled up, but that never are in emissions test hence discrepancy between real world and test economy figures.

31 May 2017
topsecret456987 wrote:

I don't understand the point of turbos for he following reasons:

too much power low down = Traction control overload and throttle cut.
Throttle turned into a switch instead of a pedal that you can never adjust to feed in power.
No revs = so turn power delivery into diesel mode (7000rpm is better fun than 5000rpm.
Sluggish throttle response as turbo spools up.
Heavy fuel consumption when spooled up, but that never are in emissions test hence discrepancy between real world and test economy figures.

Not sure when you last drove a turbo: Some of what you say was true of turbo engines in the past but not so much nowadays - better engineering and use of dual turbos with different sized (small/large) turbines has negated many of the problems and created much more linear power delivery and overcome the lag associated with large single turbos.
There are still some cars where the turbo isn't as well integrated as it could be but purely from an engineering perspective that doesn't have to be the case these days.

31 May 2017
an America only model. Hope this is not the case but it will depend on what the mods are ? If its just a hot cam version with tweaked exhaust and Halfords style rear wing then maybe not such a loss.

31 May 2017
If this has the same engine then it's totally pointless. This car always needed another 30-40hp to get it in the groove.

31 May 2017
It's always struck me as pointless offering two identical cars from different brands except you could argue that the Subaru is the real deal, while the Toyota is just a badged version of that car with a better warranty. But rather than go the costlier turbocharged route, it would have been good if one maker offered a stripped down bare bones lighter option to more performance. Then again, today's cossetted customers probably wouldn't buy into it, and lower weight probably equates to lower profit...

31 May 2017
So in what way is the Toyota's warranty better?

If I want an autonomous car, I'll take a taxi.

31 May 2017
The stated rear-biased weight distribution isn't even close to accurate. It's front-heavy, usually reported as 53%F/47%R.

1 June 2017
I stand corrected - both manufacturers provide 5 years / 100,000 miles cover, thank you. For some reason, I thought Subaru was only 3 years.

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Our Verdict

Subaru BRZ

The BRZ and the GT86 are two peas from the same pod, but we find out if the Subaru moniker makes it a different beast to the superb Toyota?

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week