System can avoid obstacles in the road and brings fully autonomous vehicles one step closer

Renault has revealed technology that enables self-driving cars to swerve to avoid obstacles in the road ahead - an industry first, the company claims. 

The technology, demonstrated in a Renault Zoe named Callie, was tested against professional drivers’ reactions and avoided unexpected road obstacles and cones as effectively as those drivers. 

The technology is seen as a key step on the road towards full, ‘mind off’ autonomy, which Renault aims to be one of the first brands to achieve. 

Simon Hougard, director of Renault’s Open Innovation Lab in Silicon Valley, said: “At Groupe Renault, we are focused on being an innovation leader in products, technology and design. Our innovation efforts aim to develop advanced autonomous driving technologies that consumers can trust will create a safer, more comfortable journey.”

The lab’s main focus is safety in autonomous technology.

Under the brand’s Drive the Future mid-term strategy, it aims to have 15 models equipped with various levels of autonomy on sale within the next five years.

Transport secretary Chris Grayling announced at an event on autonomy with the Association of British Insurers that the first fully autonomous cars are expected on British roads in around 2021. 

Read more: 

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7 November 2017

If you spend your time driving in bright sunshine on an marked airfield with no other cars on.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

7 November 2017
xxxx wrote:

If you spend your time driving in bright sunshine on an marked airfield with no other cars on.

LOL. Yes, it is called 'testing' and is essential it is carried out to find and eradicate software flaws, otherwise known as 'defects.' You really should try harder to keep up.

7 November 2017
centenary wrote:

xxxx wrote:

If you spend your time driving in bright sunshine on an marked airfield with no other cars on.

LOL. Yes, it is called 'testing' and is essential it is carried out to find and eradicate software flaws, otherwise known as 'defects.' You really should try harder to keep up.

And does every step of testing warrant a write up? Not difficult to keep up with level of progress into the abyss

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

7 November 2017
I don't know what all the fuss is about. Being a Renault it'll probably break down before it hits the obstacle anyway. Next development in Renault's autonomy:a Clio or Megane that drives itself to the garage for repair.

Can your GP prescribe anything for range anxiety?

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