Land Rover adds 395bhp turbocharged and supercharged engine to luxury SUV, replacing V6
1 May 2019

Land Rover has added its new 395bhp Ingenium straight-six petrol engine to the Range Rover. It's available to order now, priced from £83,655.

First introduced on the Range Rover Sport, the new turbocharged Ingenium engines will gradually replace the ageing Ford-sourced supercharged V6s in use across Jaguar and Land Rover's ranges. 

The 3.0-litre unit doesn’t abandon the supercharger, though, using an electrically powered version to provide a more instant response before the twin-scroll turbocharger spools up. It also makes use of a 48V mild hybrid system, boosting efficiency by supplying torque to reduce the engine’s workload.

In the Range Rover, the engine produces 395bhp and 406 lb ft of torque, making the 2.3-tonne SUV capable of 0-60mph in 5.9sec and a top speed of 140mph. Land Rover quotes a combined economy figure of 30.4mpg and CO2 emissions of 212g/km.

Land Rover has also updated the whole Range Rover line-up with new features. These include a smartphone pack featuring Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, the ability for the headlights to dim individual LEDs that could reflect back off signposts and 'Tourist Mode', which adjusts the headlight beam for driving on the left or right of the road.

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38

1 May 2019

Something other than a tuned 4 pot 2.0. Now put it in XE, F-Type, Evoque etc ASAP

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

1 May 2019
xxxx wrote:

Something other than a tuned 4 pot 2.0. Now put it in XE, F-Type, Evoque etc ASAP

Yes, this is the engine needed to make most of the JLR product range far more appealing. Lets hope they start fitting it to more models quickly

2 May 2019
xxxx wrote:

Something other than a tuned 4 pot 2.0. Now put it in XE, F-Type, Evoque etc ASAP

Unfortunately it doesn't fit in the XE :-(

1 May 2019

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1 May 2019

About time too we got the Ingenium 6. I can't imagine many V6 petrol Range Rovers were ever sold in the UK (though more would have been sold overseas) with buyers either going for the diesel or full fat V8 options.

1 May 2019

Interesting that JLR (and Mercedes) have reverted back from V6s to the in-line configuration.  I'm just a little surprised, because they must present some challenges from the packaging point of view.  Still, BMW have always managed and never gave up on them.  From what I've read, they have always been perceived to be better balanced and hence more refined.  Perhaps they "breathe" more easily too as petrol V6s have never seemed to very economical.

1 May 2019

It's mostly being done because it's far easier to add two cylinders to the middle of an inline 4 than to develop a whole new V engine. Likewise it's "easy" to drop a cylinder from the same i4 to make the i3 version that the smaller hybrid JLR vehicles will be getting.

1 May 2019
March1 wrote:

It's mostly being done because it's far easier to add two cylinders to the middle of an inline 4 than to develop a whole new V engine. Likewise it's "easy" to drop a cylinder from the same i4 to make the i3 version that the smaller hybrid JLR vehicles will be getting.

Inline 6 are also very very smooth, I have one in Z4, imho I6 is smoother than Boxer6 even.

1 May 2019
streaky wrote:

Interesting that JLR (and Mercedes) have reverted back from V6s to the in-line configuration.  I'm just a little surprised, because they must present some challenges from the packaging point of view.  Still, BMW have always managed and never gave up on them.  From what I've read, they have always been perceived to be better balanced and hence more refined.  Perhaps they "breathe" more easily too as petrol V6s have never seemed to very economical.

...that the opposite is true. Apparently, the addition of 48V systems, batteries, funny starter motors and electric 'chargers makes the packaging of a V6 increasingly difficult and that the space 'down the side' of a straight 6 alleviates this.

1 May 2019
streaky wrote:

Interesting that JLR (and Mercedes) have reverted back from V6s to the in-line configuration.  I'm just a little surprised, because they must present some challenges from the packaging point of view.  Still, BMW have always managed and never gave up on them.  From what I've read, they have always been perceived to be better balanced and hence more refined.  Perhaps they "breathe" more easily too as petrol V6s have never seemed to very economical.

When Ford owned Volvo and JLR, the plan was originally for Volvo to develop an new inline 6 to replace its ageing inline 5 (the T5 engine), and for it to be shared arround the group, consequently Volvo did the SI6 (short inline 6), this was actually shorter than the 5 pot, it was used in various Volvo models, and in the Freelander 2 in certain markets, but then Ford sold off its brands, and the rest is history..  

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