Shares have fallen relating to the announcement, although Nissan says that none of its cars has incorrect emissions figures

Nissan has admitted misconduct in its exhaust emissions testing procedure on 19 cars in Japan and submitted related information to the Japanese ministry of land, infrastructure, transport and tourism.

The brand alleges to have discovered ‘nonconformities’ in its final inspection process back in September 2017 and has since carried out an internal investigation into how the discrepancies came about. 

Reuters reports that both Nissan and sister brand Renault's shares have fallen since the announcement. 

A statement released by Nissan admits that emissions and fuel economy tests “deviated from the prescribed testing environment” and the “creation of inspection reports based on altered measurement values”. 

The misconduct was discovered through “proactive initiatives to prevent recurrence of such issues”; the initiatives were launched following the nonconformities discovered last year. 

Nissan has commissioned a law firm to investigate the issue and implemented its own preventative measures to ensure that a similar issue doesn’t occur in the future. 

Nissan has clarified that none of its cars strays from its advertised fuel economy and emissions figures and that it will continue to search for areas of non-compliance, taking the necessary steps if more are uncovered.

The misconduct was in relation only to cars manufactured in Japan, although Nissan admitted last year that a previous testing procedure had been improperly carried out for decades. A recall of 1.2 million cars across Japan was implemented.

The 370Z, GT-R and X-Trail are all produced in Japan for the UK market, but the X-Trail - the volume seller among the models - is made in the brand's Kyushu plant, which is unaffected.

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Comments
9

9 July 2018

How does Nissan explain the diesel Quashqai recording emissions 15+ times higher in independent testing?

Come on Autocar, shouldn’t you be asking these questions?

10 July 2018

Autocrat won't because there would be consequences...

For them and their employment status

nuff said.

289

9 July 2018

...they are all at it Lambo, it was the only way they could acheive impossible EU targets.

My question is, are they going to jail other brands Directors too or are they just reserving that 'special treatment' for VW?

10 July 2018

This is how electric car take up is going to accelerate because of these cheaters and let's face it.

Criminals...

9 July 2018

.....unlike VW who got found out while also trying to brush the issue under the carpet.

289

9 July 2018

....Oh! that makes it OK then?

I think Brands are putting their hands up because they know the game is up....and have seen the harsh treatment of VW Directors.

They are sh***ing themselves.

But as far as mpg figures...as others have said, to take the printed figures as gospel is absolute stupidity....and then in the same breath to mention compensation just shows the American style litigious  mentality of opportunists.

Its a disease in the UK which needs to be stamped out, or we will end up like the Americans...terrified of the blood sucking lawyers.

9 July 2018

We've all been conned into not expecting our cars to achieve their quoted fuel economy figures in every day driving, but our Nissan is achieving almost half what the brochure said it would. That's misselling if ever there was a case of it - so can we expect to be able to make a claim?

 

Everyone has a right to an opinion - don't confuse that with insulting your mother :-)

9 July 2018
gavsmit wrote:

We've all been conned into not expecting our cars to achieve their quoted fuel economy figures in every day driving, but our Nissan is achieving almost half what the brochure said it would. That's misselling if ever there was a case of it - so can we expect to be able to make a claim?

That's simply tosh. Say Nissan publish a figure of 50mpg for their car. You are expecting that car to achieve 50mpg during winter in Norway, 50mpg during summer in Spain. You're expecting it to achieve 50mpg in to a headwind and 50mpg with a tailwind? You expect it to achieve 50mpg thru driving rain and in a drought. You expect it to achieve 50mpg with a single owner and 50mpg with two adults 2.5 children and their labrador?

What's wrong with people's brains? These tests are designed to compare cars on an equal basis - they are done in laboratory conditions. Cars differed from their stated mpg before EU tests, during the EU tests and will differ under the new testing system. If you expect a car company to produce a figure specific to everyone who drives it, then prepare to be disappointed.

 

You say Nissan misselling. I say it's you misunderstanding. (and not reading what the brouchure actually says about the figures).

9 July 2018
gavsmit wrote:

We've all been conned into not expecting our cars to achieve their quoted fuel economy figures in every day driving, but our Nissan is achieving almost half what the brochure said it would. That's misselling if ever there was a case of it - so can we expect to be able to make a claim?

I hope Autocar and Nissan won;t mind me quoting directly from their UK brouchre but this is what they write:

"These figures are obtained from laboratory testing, are intended for comparisons between vehicles and may not reflect real life driving results. Optional equipment, maintenance, driving behaviour, road and weather conditions may affect the official results."

It's not the manufacturers who're at fault, it's their customers who can't be arsed to actually read what's clearly stated in front of them.

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