Currently reading: New Mini hatchback spotted
Latest spy shots reveal the new Mini hatchback, which could be officially unveiled later this year
Lewis Kingston
News
1 min read
22 May 2013

Spy shots have revealed the next generation of Mini hatchback being tested on the road with minimal camouflage.

Changes to the all-new Mini's styling, compared to the previous generation, include a wide front grille and large headlights with integral daytime running lights. Larger, redesigned rear lights are also apparent.

Reputedly, the new third-generation Mini will deliver a substantial leap forwards in terms of quality, performance and handling. It's thought it could be officially unveiled later this year.

All existing variants of the Mini will be replaced with versions based on the upcoming model, which is underpinned by BMW's recently developed UKL1 platform.

It's rumoured that the new Mini family could extend by up to 11 models; BMW has admitted previously that up to 23 different versions could eventually go into production.

As well as the high-performance versions, the new Mini will be offered with a choice of a petrol or diesel three-cylinder 1.5-litre engine. A six-speed manual gearbox will be available, as will an eight-speed automatic transmission.

More Mini models may also receive four-wheel drive in the future, as demand grows for the improved stability and security that it offers. 

BMW, in preparation for the launch of the new model, has already completed work on the new facilities and training programmes required to build the Mini 3.

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Will86 22 May 2013

Looks Good

If it ain't broke don't fix it. Mini owners (we have a Clubman) like the styling and don't want something radically different. Shame about the loss of the central speedo, though we use the digital one on the rev counter, the radio they've put in its place looks like an after thought. However the real key to the Mini's success is ownership costs. Providing they get these right people can enjoy the car with their head and their heart. Looking forward to the three cylinder turbo, should suit the car perfectly. 

jensen_healey 22 May 2013

Still the same dire packaging

Still the same dire packaging and comedy dashboard....are BMW planning on keeping this going for another 40 years?!

The fact that the original was around for 50 years without a re-design was a crying shame and a result of the worst management ever of the UK car industry which ultimately led to it's demise....

Flatus senex 22 May 2013

Glad they have not used any stylistic imagination

Judging from recent products of this maker other road users should be glad the stylists have not attempted anything more daring. The vehicle badly needs a spark of originality though.

However, equally it needs better space utilisation inside. The external dimensions are surprisingly large whilst legroom and boot space are restricted. Hopefully the new vehicle is an improvement here. I can't comment upon the driving experience although there are some, who whilst acknowledging it drives well, do not accept it is either "go-kart like" or the class leader.

Ironic that this stolid design exercise should be defended on the grounds of "if it's not broke don't fix it" which is another way of "we've always done it this way"! The original Mini idea was the very reverse of this sort of philosophy. Time for the spirit to be revived.

MikeSpencer 22 May 2013

Flatus senex wrote:Judging

Flatus senex wrote:

Judging from recent products of this maker other road users should be glad the stylists have not attempted anything more daring. The vehicle badly needs a spark of originality though.

However, equally it needs better space utilisation inside. The external dimensions are surprisingly large whilst legroom and boot space are restricted. Hopefully the new vehicle is an improvement here. I can't comment upon the driving experience although there are some, who whilst acknowledging it drives well, do not accept it is either "go-kart like" or the class leader.

Ironic that this stolid design exercise should be defended on the grounds of "if it's not broke don't fix it" which is another way of "we've always done it this way"! The original Mini idea was the very reverse of this sort of philosophy. Time for the spirit to be revived.

Totally agree with Flatus senex's statement regarding the original Mini's design philosophy. It was to maximise the interior space for four adults and luggage using the smallest dimensions and fewest materials possible. The Suez crisis and microcars forced Issigonis to be brave with his design and the Mini was the result. Of course there isn't a need to be this bold anymore - the new MINI enjoys remarkable success - but the bold design philosophy should still remain. If it doesn't, then it isn't a Mini (or should that be MINI?).

Flatus senex 22 May 2013

MikeSpencer wrote:  

MikeSpencer wrote:

 

Totally agree with Flatus senex's statement regarding the original Mini's design philosophy. It was to maximise the interior space for four adults and luggage using the smallest dimensions and fewest materials possible. The Suez crisis and microcars forced Issigonis to be brave with his design and the Mini was the result. Of course there isn't a need to be this bold anymore - the new MINI enjoys remarkable success - but the bold design philosophy should still remain. If it doesn't, then it isn't a Mini (or should that be MINI?).

[/quote]

Actually it should be called the TUBBY or perhaps TUBBI

MikeSpencer 22 May 2013

Re: TUBBY / TUBBI

Sure it doesn't weigh 600-odd kg anymore - more like nearly double that - but it's only a reflection of modern car design keeping up with legislation and customer expectation (i.e. kit). Personally, I'm happy to drive around town in a box on wheels with just a seat and steering wheel for company but it seems the law and majority of buyers aren't. That's life I'm afraid Flatus Senex.

Flatus senex 23 May 2013

TUBBY/TUBBI

MikeSpencer wrote:

Sure it doesn't weigh 600-odd kg anymore - more like nearly double that - but it's only a reflection of modern car design keeping up with legislation and customer expectation (i.e. kit). Personally, I'm happy to drive around town in a box on wheels with just a seat and steering wheel for company but it seems the law and majority of buyers aren't. That's life I'm afraid Flatus Senex.

It's a bit worse than that I am afraid. Stylistically it is the equivalent of a Harris Tweed jacket with leather elbow patches. This is perhaps to be preferred to the manufacturer's attempts to produce something a bit more novel which have been appalling, except for one concept vehicle which never made it to production. Contrast this with Citroen whose DS3 was a concept car which did make it to production with spectacular success.

I prefer to drive around in a vehicle with enhanced passive safety and like a few useful toys such as cruise control. Such things inevitably lead to increased weight and size. However all the competition do better when it comes to the ratio of useable space to vehicle size. Hopefully this  new model will deliver improvements in this respect even if it is not very 21st. century in looks.

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