Petrol-electric crossover will be capable of 75mpg, and available to buy in September
8 August 2019

The new Hyundai Kona Hybrid will be priced from £22,495 when it goes on sale in the UK near the end of September.

The latest version of the Korean firm’s compact SUV, which joins the existing petrol, diesel and fully electric models, will be offered in three trim levels, all of which will use the same 1.6-litre petrol-electric powertrain.

That unit, taken from Kia’s larger Niro, makes 104bhp on its own and is mated to a 43bhp electric motor also powering the front wheels. 

Both are linked through a six-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox and a small (1.56kWh) lithium ion battery that recharges through coasting and braking. Total system output is 139bhp, with a combined torque figure of 195lb ft. That’s sufficient for a 0-62mph time of 11.2sec on the smallest wheel size, and a maximum speed of just under 100mph.

The hybrid is considerably more frugal on paper than the normal petrol equivalents, managing a claimed 72mpg (66mpg on 18in wheels) and CO2 emissions of 90g/km (99g/km on 18in wheels). For comparison, Hyundai claims the base 1.0 T-GDI petrol engine manages 54.3mpg combined. 

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Hyundai Kona

Hyundai's funky-looking Kona crossover is making all the right noises for the car to be a success in a crowded segment

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Entry-level Kona Hybrid SE models feature climate control, 16in wheels with a design bespoke to the hybrid version, special badges and unique white accents on the air vents and gear level. There is a 7in touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto connectivity, rear parking sensors and camera and lane-keeping assist.

The mid-level Kona Hybrid Premium starts at £24,295, and additions include 18in wheels, a 10.25in touchscreen, Krell sound system, keyless entry, privacy glass and wireless smartphone charging.

The top Premium SE trim level is priced from £27,195 and includes the likes of LED front and rear lights, standard autonomous emergency braking, heated and ventilated leather seats and a head-up display.

All three trim levels are available with different versions of Hyundai’s SmartSense safety packs as options.

The £22,495 starting price for the Kona Hybrid compares to £17,305 for the petrol, and £27,250 for the electric version.

Read more

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Comments
15

3 June 2019

When you say 'supply restricted' for the Electric version you actually mean not available till sometime in 2020. Which is a bit of scam as I think for the price it was the best EV available.

Back to the car in question. Mild Hybrids may make sense but you have to do the maths first, (and put up slower accelation in this case), be great for Autocar to run the 3 versions for a day but a 1.5kWh barely seems worth the effort of installation.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

3 June 2019
xxxx wrote:

When you say 'supply restricted' for the Electric version you actually mean not available till sometime in 2020. Which is a bit of scam as I think for the price it was the best EV available.

Back to the car in question. Mild Hybrids may make sense but you have to do the maths first, (and put up slower accelation in this case), be great for Autocar to run the 3 versions for a day but a 1.5kWh barely seems worth the effort of installation.

This is basically the Hyundai equivalent of a Kia Niro hybrid. It's a full hybrid, and it only has a small battery pack as it's not intended to run for any great length of time on the battery; it's there to utilise the relatively low-output petrol engine more effectively.

I've got an Ioniq with the same drivetrain and it's very effective indeed.

3 June 2019
captainaverage wrote:
xxxx wrote:

When you say 'supply restricted' for the Electric version you actually mean not available till sometime in 2020. Which is a bit of scam as I think for the price it was the best EV available.

Back to the car in question. Mild Hybrids may make sense but you have to do the maths first, (and put up slower accelation in this case), be great for Autocar to run the 3 versions for a day but a 1.5kWh barely seems worth the effort of installation.

This is basically the Hyundai equivalent of a Kia Niro hybrid. It's a full hybrid, and it only has a small battery pack as it's not intended to run for any great length of time on the battery; it's there to utilise the relatively low-output petrol engine more effectively. I've got an Ioniq with the same drivetrain and it's very effective indeed.

Same drive train as the Niro different platform though the Niro and Hyundai Ioniq are the same platforms. I had a Niro Hybrid as a hire car recently for covering 600 miles - it averaged 50mpg over the course of combined driving. We better in town when it ran in electric mode. The gearbox is jerky though. 

4 June 2019
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

captainaverage wrote:
xxxx wrote:

When you say 'supply restricted' for the Electric version you actually mean not available till sometime in 2020. Which is a bit of scam as I think for the price it was the best EV available.

Back to the car in question. Mild Hybrids may make sense but you have to do the maths first, (and put up slower accelation in this case), be great for Autocar to run the 3 versions for a day but a 1.5kWh barely seems worth the effort of installation.

This is basically the Hyundai equivalent of a Kia Niro hybrid. It's a full hybrid, and it only has a small battery pack as it's not intended to run for any great length of time on the battery; it's there to utilise the relatively low-output petrol engine more effectively. I've got an Ioniq with the same drivetrain and it's very effective indeed.

Same drive train as the Niro different platform though the Niro and Hyundai Ioniq are the same platforms. I had a Niro Hybrid as a hire car recently for covering 600 miles - it averaged 50mpg over the course of combined driving. We better in town when it ran in electric mode. The gearbox is jerky though. 

All that tech and cost outlay and still only 50 mpg, not great, 1.5 COD Golf would equal that  that and my old father in laws A3 COD got 53 mpg over 40,000 miles. Both cars probably quicker to 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

4 June 2019
captainaverage wrote:
xxxx wrote:

When you say 'supply restricted' for the Electric version you actually mean not available till sometime in 2020. Which is a bit of scam as I think for the price it was the best EV available.

Back to the car in question. Mild Hybrids may make sense but you have to do the maths first, (and put up slower accelation in this case), be great for Autocar to run the 3 versions for a day but a 1.5kWh barely seems worth the effort of installation.

This is basically the Hyundai equivalent of a Kia Niro hybrid. It's a full hybrid, and it only has a small battery pack as it's not intended to run for any great length of time on the battery; it's there to utilise the relatively low-output petrol engine more effectively. I've got an Ioniq with the same drivetrain and it's very effective indeed.

Emm I don't think it is a full hybrid (I'd call it a mild hybrid), in the sense it can run on the battery alone. If you think it can just how far can it go on a 1.5kwh battery?

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 August 2019

'Kona Hybrid Premium' starts at £24,290, whereas the 1.0t ICE Premium is £19.9k.

So basically how long will it take to get your £4,300 back by saving £25% in fuel costs for the private buyer.   £500 a year makes it over 8 years pay back !!!

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 August 2019

The hybrid is however the cheapest way to get an automatic Kona.

8 August 2019

That might be so, but the problem is it's not longer a cheap'ish Korean car anymore.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

8 August 2019

I don’t think either Hyundai or Kia are that bothered about the  ‘cheap’ish’ car market. That will now belong to the Chinese manufacturers like MG.

24 August 2019
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