Currently reading: New Civic Type R to fly flag for last pure-petrol Hondas
Next-gen hot hatch to get petrol swansong, exempt from firm’s electrification plan
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3 mins read
11 January 2021

Honda’s plan to electrify its line-up by 2022 won’t extend to the next Civic Type R, which will retain a high-output turbo petrol engine, Autocar has learned.

In late 2019, Honda brought forward its plan to offer hybrid or fully electric variants of every mainstream model from 2025 to 2022 due to “the pace of change in regulation, the market and consumer behaviour in Europe”, said Honda Europe’s senior vice-president, Tom Gardner.

But that plan will exclude the upcoming Type R version of the 11th-generation Civic, which, when it arrives in 2022, will be one of the last purely petrol-powered Hondas on sale.

An “ultimate high-performance” Type R will return once again, Honda confirmed during the unveiling of the next Civic in prototype, US-focused saloon form. The standard car will be launched globally in the spring, with UK deliveries expected before the end of this year. The Type R will arrive a few months after that.

With the hatchback bodystyle vastly more popular than the saloon in Western Europe, it’s expected that the Type R will once again be based on the five-door. The outlandish design of the current car will evolve but is unlikely to be toned down too much – and Honda may offer a more subtly styled, wingless Sport Line variant as with the current model. Spy shots of the next-gen Type R support this idea while also revealing what appears to be a longer wheelbase than today’s car to boost passenger space.

Honda promises a “dramatic interior makeover” for the Mk11 Civic. Expect perceived quality improvements and a more mature look and feel, plus substantially overhauled infotainment, since Honda bosses have previously admitted to Autocar that the company is currently behind other firms with such tech.

The usual racy addenda, such as sports seats, red detailing and the signature aluminium gearknob, will mark out the Type R version.

It is expected that the powertrain will be as evolutionary as the model’s exterior. A version of the current car’s widely praised ‘K20C1’ 2.0-litre directinjection turbo four-cylinder is tipped to power the Volkswagen Golf GTI Clubsport rival, albeit with a number of upgrades to boost both performance and efficiency.

Given today’s Civic Type R is already approaching the limits of what’s possible with a front-wheel-drive car, outright power output may not be substantially greater than the current 316bhp, but we could see improvements to the engine’s turbocharger response and torque delivery.

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Technical details of the Mk11 Civic’s chassis have yet to be revealed, but major changes to the layout or configuration are not expected.

For the Type R, that should mean a return of the dual-axis strut front suspension, with an advanced limited-slip differential to help control the power coming through the front axle. At the rear, a multi-link set-up is likely to be retained, while adaptive damping will allow the hot Civic to offer greater differentiation between its comfort-oriented and racier drive modes.

Given that the Type R is likely to stick fairly closely to its current brief, a substantial price rise isn’t expected, meaning the hot hatch should start from around £35,000.

READ MORE

Honda to electrify European line-up by 2022, not 2025 

Honda to stop selling pure petrol and diesel cars in Europe in 2022 

2022 Honda Civic Type R: next-gen hot hatch seen for first time

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Dunhillion 11 January 2021

I know most will want a manual in this car, and understand why - but is an auto likely to be an option for the 22MY Type R? So tempted by a Type R, but as a daily driver I personally would prefer an auto - not as interactive, but so much more usable with 90% of the driving enjoyment as the manual. Maybe something which would suit the Sport Line variant, with the other versions staying manual only?

xxxx 11 January 2021
Dunhillion wrote:

I know most will want a manual in this car, and understand why - but is an auto likely to be an option for the 22MY Type R? So tempted by a Type R, but as a daily driver I personally would prefer an auto - not as interactive, but so much more usable with 90% of the driving enjoyment as the manual. Maybe something which would suit the Sport Line variant, with the other versions staying manual only?

Auto unlikely as Type R will be in its last production year and probably not worth the investment for such small sales.  Then just compare the Focus St Auto versus the Focus St Manual, check out top gear report and sales info.

Dunhillion 11 January 2021

Thanks - I don't suppose you have a link to that please? Also, as you say, an auto makes no sense for the current model Type R - but the next generation?

xxxx 11 January 2021
Dunhillion wrote:

Thanks - I don't suppose you have a link to that please? Also, as you say, an auto makes no sense for the current model Type R - but the next generation?

Cant add links but its on the top gear website. Next gen wont be pure petrol so unlikey to be a manual.  

mpls 11 January 2021
xxxx wrote:

Dunhillion wrote:

I know most will want a manual in this car, and understand why - but is an auto likely to be an option for the 22MY Type R? So tempted by a Type R, but as a daily driver I personally would prefer an auto - not as interactive, but so much more usable with 90% of the driving enjoyment as the manual. Maybe something which would suit the Sport Line variant, with the other versions staying manual only?

Auto unlikely as Type R will be in its last production year and probably not worth the investment for such small sales.  Then just compare the Focus St Auto versus the Focus St Manual, check out top gear report and sales info.

 

An auto will most probabky not be availble in the next gen Type R, but not because of your reaasoning that it is in it last year of prodcicton, it is not in its last year, it's  a new model. The maim reason more likely because of low demand for an auto.

artill 11 January 2021

I have no issue with Honda, nor Hybrids, but  the 2 i have owned to date (Insight and CRZ) have both been manuals. Unless Honda re-introduce something like their IMA system, everything will be automatic only, with the exception of this type R. And whilst the Type R will no doubt be brilliant, the loss of normal Hondas with a manual box will be very sad

Einarbb 11 January 2021

As an owner of 2018 Civic - I'm clearly not unhappy with the looks. It certainly stands out, and it has lower profile than most comparable cars; the lower stance is part of what I like about it sort of exactly opposite of trends that has had cars getting higher meaning higher center of gravity. The relatively low stance of the current Civic naturally aids handling which is excellent. And best of all, excellent handling combinates with fine comfort. Really great car.

si73 11 January 2021
You aren't alone, I think they look great, the fastback style hatch as opposed to the estate style hatch of a golf has always been a preference of mine, that and as you say its overall low profile makes the car look dynamic standing still. I've driven a couple and my 19yr old son just bought a 2017 1.0 SR, which is a great car to drive and look at, in my and his opinion.

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