Flaccid figures released by SMMT show another downturn, with low consumer confidence and diesel backlash main culprits
5 July 2018

UK car registrations for the first half of 2018 were down 6.3% over the same period in 2017, with the lowest number of new cars registered in the month of June since 2014 at 234,945.

In January-June, just over 1.3 million cars were registered, according to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) — almost 88,000 fewer than in the same period in 2017. In June, registrations were down 3.5% compared with June 2017, with nearly 11,000 fewer cars registered. 

Diesel registrations in June were down 28.2% year on year, representing 29,000 fewer cars than in June 2017, which itself declined by nearly 12,000 diesels compared with June 2016. In January-June, the diesel decline was more than 30%, with diesels now making up less than 32% of the UK market. 

This trend continues to concern SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes, who called for greater government reassurance to the public that new diesel technology still has a place in the modern automotive marketplace: “Alternatively fuelled cars still represent only one in 20 registrations; they cannot yet have the impact in driving down overall emissions that conventional vehicles, including diesels, continue to deliver.”

June was a particularly strong month for alternatively fuelled vehicles, with the segment growing by 45% year on year and accounting for more than 15,500 monthly sales. Almost 73,000 alternatively fuelled cars have been registered to UK roads so far this year. “Despite a rocky first six months for the new car market, it’s great to see demand for alternatively fuelled vehicles continue to rise,” said Hawes.

“Recent government statements acknowledging the importance of petrol and diesel are encouraging. However, we now need a strategy that supports industry investment into next-generation technologies and puts motorists back in the driving seat, encouraged to buy the car that best suits their needs — whatever its fuel type.”

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The private market posted only a modest decline in June, with a 0.6% fall taking the total down to 94,694 cars from 95,297 in June last year. The fleet market decreased by 6.4% in the same period, while business customers grew by more than 11% to 10,274 cars.

In terms of car segments, SUVs grew by 16.4%  in June, with executive cars and luxury saloons the only other segments to post increases. Smaller cars retained their dominant 57.4% share of the market, though, with the Ford Fiesta remaining the UK’s most popular new car. 

Read more: 

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New car registrations show modest growth in May

The winners and losers in 2017's UK car market

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Comments
13

5 July 2018

Do not think it is anything to do with the brexit excuse it is down to bad policy from Government  abd EU emissions and resulting  adverse press coverage.

it started with well paid _uckwit osborne screwing certain cars and anything over £40k so you can't even get a Discovery Sport HSE Auto with solid paint for that , afew months ago you could without metalic paint . That is unless you want to pay £1550 more or so over next five years,not a lot but an irritation that is designed to brass many of us off new cars.The best buy being a V8 mustange with onlt £140 ved tax each year as it is under £40k some ridiculas policy.The next major thing is the new emissions tests supposed to be ready for september october,companies are deleting models left right and centre if they are more than midway tghrough the life cycle .A large diesel suv is suddenly over £1800 first year registration plus the other £1550 n ot a massive amount compared to list price but just annoying.Diesels will still rule over 2 litre suv etc for a while yet.I am not convinced of the true low emissions of electric just yet.Coal still provides the  greater source for electricity generation throughout the world.Pollution creating the battery packs?

5 July 2018

must swap this keyboard

5 July 2018

Banging on and on about diesels when nobody wants them puts credibility of SMMT in serious doubt.

Sales of new diesel cars is collapsing. The same is happening on used cars. Nobody wants diesels.

Of course SMMT is trying to defend Land Rover.  Luckily the car-buying public can see through the thinly-veiled nonsense the SMMT continues to peddle.

5 July 2018
soldi wrote:

Banging on and on about diesels when nobody wants them puts credibility of SMMT in serious doubt.

Sales of new diesel cars is collapsing. The same is happening on used cars. Nobody wants diesels.

Of course SMMT is trying to defend Land Rover.  Luckily the car-buying public can see through the thinly-veiled nonsense the SMMT continues to peddle.

Sorry but I believe you’re factually wrong on your claims about diesels. 32% of cars being diesels shows that people clearly do. I can only imagine you are not someone who does large annual mileages and commutes daily on motorways. 

Those are the people who need 60mpg + vehicles, and there is currently no hybrid or petrol car that can realistically match that.

5 July 2018
Mini2 wrote:

Sorry but I believe you’re factually wrong on your claims about diesels. 32% of cars being diesels shows that people clearly do.

That means 68% don’t want diesel; and that number is growing. Simple maths really.

8 July 2018
soldi wrote:

Mini2 wrote:

Sorry but I believe you’re factually wrong on your claims about diesels. 32% of cars being diesels shows that people clearly do.

That means 68% don’t want diesel; and that number is growing. Simple maths really.

68% is very different to 100%, pal. There’s nothing to suggest it’ll hit 100% within the next couple of years. The well informed will continue to buy diesel where necessary - and others will now be buying petrol because they realise they didn’t need diesel. Simple, really.

5 July 2018
Ski Kid wrote:

....Coal still provides the  greater source for electricity generation throughout the world.Pollution creating the battery packs?

Not all electicity goes into a BEV so Worldwide Coal use is misleading. You'll find some of the SOME of the biggest users of BEVs use less coal than renewables like windpower/solar/hydro which are still increasing.

Example: UK very little <9%, Germany MORE enegy from renewables than Coal, US coal usage from 59% in 1997 to 39% in 2017. Spot the trend.

You can't get away from the fact if you drive a BEV in the UK then at least 15% of the fuel comes from wind/solar/hydro. Norway it's 100%, Germany it's a massive 39%

Anyway one thing is certain Diesel/ Petrol is 100% fossil and UNrenewable

 

5 July 2018

Can someone genuinely help me out here:

As I've said before, I believe diesel will be dead by the end of 2021.  Now, I base that on simply looking at the sales figures.  If you draw a line, even a curved one, it points to zero sales of diesel CARS by December 2021.  Now, I appreciate others here don't share my view, and that's fine.  But what I don't understand is that manufacturers see these figures too.  If you buy a diesel car now, you're going to struggle to sell it!  Yesterday, I was talking to someone from Vauxhall.  I explained that their lack of petrol alternatives with their vans is going to bite their buyers in three years from now.  Many vans have poor resale values, but in three years, those resale values are going to be even worse - because there is more diesel legislation to come in that time period.

So my point is, why isn't diesel dying even quicker - why aren't manufacturers withdrawing their diesel engines even faster?  They know that the resale values in three years from now will be terrible, and they know that owners will cause a backlash for 'letting' them buy a diesel engine.  Think of it in a mis-sold pension or loan way.

5 July 2018
Bazzer wrote:

Can someone genuinely help me out here:

As I've said before, I believe diesel will be dead by the end of 2021.  Now, I base that on simply looking at the sales figures.  If you draw a line, even a curved one, it points to zero sales of diesel CARS by December 2021.  Now, I appreciate others here don't share my view, and that's fine.  But what I don't understand is that manufacturers see these figures too.  If you buy a diesel car now, you're going to struggle to sell it!  Yesterday, I was talking to someone from Vauxhall.  I explained that their lack of petrol alternatives with their vans is going to bite their buyers in three years from now.  Many vans have poor resale values, but in three years, those resale values are going to be even worse - because there is more diesel legislation to come in that time period.

So my point is, why isn't diesel dying even quicker - why aren't manufacturers withdrawing their diesel engines even faster?  They know that the resale values in three years from now will be terrible, and they know that owners will cause a backlash for 'letting' them buy a diesel engine.  Think of it in a mis-sold pension or loan way.

I’ll help you out - it’s because there’s still a consumer need for diesels. Skoda have discontinued the diesel Fabia - as a direct result (but other reasons too) - I wouldn’t be able to affordably run a petrol Fabia right now - the fuel consumption just isn’t comparable and I’d be filling up several times per week.

Therefore if diesels were sold for their proper function - ie where fuel economy is important and for those who do long journeys and high mileage’s, this wouldn’t be such an issue - and there wouldn’t have been so many diesels on the roads in the first place! 

5 July 2018
We are halfway through changing to the WLTP from NEDC. The nature of the 2040 ICE ban is splitting cabinet, five of our biggest cities are cooking up clean air zones with Birmingham planning on charging all Euro 5 diesels and the MOT has just become harder to pass.

Sales have dropped because no one has a clue anymore.

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