BMW 114d starts production in November, together with a range of new engines for the 3-series
3 September 2012

A new entry-level BMW 1-series model will enter production in November, carrying the 114d nameplate.

The new variant is part of a raft of scheduled model updates, including fresh engines and options for both the 1-series and 3-series range.

The 114d will carry a 1.6-litre version of BMW’s four-cylinder turbocharged diesel engine, generating 94bhp and 173lb ft. Performance figures include a 0-62mph time of 12.2sec and a top speed of 115mph, combined with 65.7mpg combined fuel consumption and 112g/km CO2 emissions.

EfficientDynamics equipment is made standard for the 114d, including automatic start-stop function and regenerative braking. The new engine option is available to order for both three and five-door cars, with pricing yet to be confirmed.

In addition, both the 3-series saloon and Touring ranges will be bolstered by new engine options. The 3-series saloon gains a petrol EfficientDynamics model, the 320i, powered by a 168bhp 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol unit achieving 53.3mpg and 124g/km CO2. The saloon range also has a new entry point in the shape of the 316i variant, carrying a 134bhp version of the 1.6-litre turbocharged engine paired with a six-speed manual gearbox and priced from £22,850.

The 3-series Touring range gains three new engines, comprising the 320i, 318d and 316d variants. This increases the range to two petrol and four diesel engines in total. The 316d ES Touring is priced from £26,180 and the BMW 318d SE Touring from £28,280.

BMW’s most up-to-date navigation system, previously standard for 3-series Touring models only, will also be made available for 3-series saloon models from November.

 

James Taylor

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A final facelift for the rear-wheel drive BMW 1 Series, as it aims to take class honours from the formidable Audi A3 and the Mercedes-Benz A-Class

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Comments
15

3 September 2012

Till they announce what they will cost, costs more, but will save you money?

Peter Cavellini.

3 September 2012

Why bother making cars, when BMW are so at selling badges!

4 September 2012

peterover wrote:

Why bother making cars, when BMW are so at selling badges!

Why bother making badges when Alfa Romeo's discolour and Peugeot fall off.

4 September 2012

The 114D should dip below 100g/Km CO2, most other manufacturers 1.6D do,

 Volvo V40 D2 SE

Price £21,345; 0-60mph 11.7sec; Top speed 118mph; Economy78.5mpg (combined); CO2 94g/km; Kerb weight na; Engine 4 cyls, 1560cc, turbodiesel; Installation Front, transverse, FWD; Power 114bhp at 3600rpm; Torque 199lb ft at 1750-2500rpm; Gearbox 6-spd manual;

So the BMW is not very efficient or dynamic really..

4 September 2012

I don't think that every BMW should be a performance car but 0-62 in 12.2 seconds??? In 2012??

4 September 2012

Horrific. It's 2012 and BMW still hasn't launched a front wheel drive car. It must be why I see so many left at the side of the road when it snows?

 

4 September 2012

BenC30 wrote:

Horrific. It's 2012 and BMW still hasn't launched a front wheel drive car. It must be why I see so many left at the side of the road when it snows?

 

Why worry so much about the 2 days a year when it might snow? Just take the day off work or if it really worries you get winter tyres. RWD is much better for the other 363 days a year.

Don't see the point in this 1 Series, who wants a car this slow which doesn't even get below 100g/km?

4 September 2012

I know many people who have moved away from BMWs due to their poor handling in anything other than dry days with dry roads.

My aunt used to put a bag of sand in the back of their 3-Series when it rained, because the handling was so poor. A colleague with a 5-Series couldn't make it up a normal hill in the ice, whilst they had a fifteen year old Saab overtake them.

These types of instances put people off. I would rather have a car that handles well all year round. Whatever the weather.  

 

4 September 2012

BenC30 wrote:

I know many people who have moved away from BMWs due to their poor handling in anything other than dry days with dry roads.

My aunt used to put a bag of sand in the back of their 3-Series when it rained, because the handling was so poor. A colleague with a 5-Series couldn't make it up a normal hill in the ice, whilst they had a fifteen year old Saab overtake them.

These types of instances put people off. I would rather have a car that handles well all year round. Whatever the weather.  

Many?  Two?  That many?  Is that many?  You don't know me.  I've only ever owned BMWs.  Use them all year round, on OEM tyres.  I'm no driving God, far, far, from it, but if your aunt needed a bag of sand in the back of her 3 Series when it rained, then she is a very poor driver, and probably should be in nothing more than a KA, with restricted pedal travel at that.  Similarly if your colleague couldn't get his 5 Series up a hill because it was icy, then he approached the hill poorly, and so probably should get some more driving instruction, that way we'd all benefit from their improved skill and knowledge because, frankly, otherwise I don't want to share the roads with someone that drives like that. 

As for "putting people off", I don't see BMW's sales suffering, despite all the doom mongers, do you?

 

 

.

4 September 2012

The Colonel wrote:

BenC30 wrote:

I know many people who have moved away from BMWs due to their poor handling in anything other than dry days with dry roads.

My aunt used to put a bag of sand in the back of their 3-Series when it rained, because the handling was so poor. A colleague with a 5-Series couldn't make it up a normal hill in the ice, whilst they had a fifteen year old Saab overtake them.

These types of instances put people off. I would rather have a car that handles well all year round. Whatever the weather.  

Many?  Two?  That many?  Is that many?  You don't know me.  I've only ever owned BMWs.  Use them all year round, on OEM tyres.  I'm no driving God, far, far, from it, but if your aunt needed a bag of sand in the back of her 3 Series when it rained, then she is a very poor driver, and probably should be in nothing more than a KA, with restricted pedal travel at that.  Similarly if your colleague couldn't get his 5 Series up a hill because it was icy, then he approached the hill poorly, and so probably should get some more driving instruction, that way we'd all benefit from their improved skill and knowledge because, frankly, otherwise I don't want to share the roads with someone that drives like that. 

As for "putting people off", I don't see BMW's sales suffering, despite all the doom mongers, do you?

 

 

.

A Whif in the air ... yes I recognise that smell.

I would say that from the experience of my 3 series the benefits of rwd are even more obvious in the wet with superior traction to the fwd cars I've had, there's no scrambling around for grip or furious spinning of an inside wheel when coming off a roundabout, for example. It just grips any goes with just the occasional flash from the tc.

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