Currently reading: New Aston Martin V6 hybrid will be brand's most powerful engine
Aston details its new, in-house V6, set to be introduced in the mid-engined Valhalla in hybrid form from 2022, with plug-in hybrids also on the cards
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2 mins read
24 March 2020

Aston Martin has detailed its new, in-house-designed hybrid V6 powertrain for the first time. 

Set to be deployed initially in the Valhalla mid-engined supercar from 2022, the engine has already undergone “extensive” dyno testing. It is codenamed TM01 after Tadek Marek, Aston's famed engineer of the 1950s and 1960s. 

The turbocharged 3.0-litre V6, the brand’s first all-in-house engine since 1968, will be mated to a “new range of hybrid systems” being developed alongside it, including both straight hybrid and plug-in hybrid applications. 

It's claimed to be the most powerful engine in Aston Martin's range. While that's as specific as it gets at this stage, we know it will produce more than the 715bhp of the DBS Superleggera in its raciest form. 

It features a a dry sump and a ‘hot V’ structure (where the turbo/turbos are mounted within the engine’s six cylinder heads) to ensure it's compact enough to squeeze in both front and mid-mounted applications and weighs less than 200kg. 

Aston claims power and torque levels will be “determined by the desired characteristics of each product it serves”, meaning other models will also receive the new unit. It is claimed to offer “the performance characteristics of a mid-engined sports car on an extreme level”, and meets the future Euro 7 emissions regulation. 

The engine is set to also make its way into the 2023 Vanquish. Although likely, it's not yet clear if it will be adapted for use in the promised future hybrid DBX

Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer said of the new engine: “Investing in your own powertrains is a tall order, but our team have risen to the challenge. Moving forward, this power unit will be integral to a lot of what we do and the first signs of what this engine will achieve are incredibly promising.”

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14

24 March 2020

If only it does fulfil its brief, will anything bigger than six cylinders ever be needed again?

24 March 2020

Apparentlly a V6 is naturally balanced to produce a smooth engine.   It is a good choice and sadly for us petrol heads the future is hybrid with fewer cylinders.

 

As I've said before it is not the engineering at Aston that is the problem but rather the design of the cars.   For many of thier customers they really do not care what type or who makes the engine.   They just want a beautiful car.   One that young boys would stick posters of on their walls!   Ones that woman would think were gorgeous.

 

Marek Reichman is not delivering those designs.   That is your problem at Aston Martin.   Too many disasters have gone in to production with this failed designer and too many more planned.   To keep repeating the same and expecting different results is a sign of insanity.

 

If Palmer will not sack Reichman then Aston also needs a new CEO.

 

24 March 2020
Symanski wrote:

Apparentlly a V6 is naturally balanced to produce a smooth engine.   It is a good choice and sadly for us petrol heads the future is hybrid with fewer cylinders.

 

As I've said before it is not the engineering at Aston that is the problem but rather the design of the cars.   For many of thier customers they really do not care what type or who makes the engine.   They just want a beautiful car.   One that young boys would stick posters of on their walls!   Ones that woman would think were gorgeous.

 

Marek Reichman is not delivering those designs.   That is your problem at Aston Martin.   Too many disasters have gone in to production with this failed designer and too many more planned.   To keep repeating the same and expecting different results is a sign of insanity.

 

If Palmer will not sack Reichman then Aston also needs a new CEO.

 

24 March 2020
Symanski wrote:

As I've said before it is not the engineering at Aston that is the problem but rather the design of the cars.   For many of thier customers they really do not care what type or who makes the engine.   They just want a beautiful car.   One that young boys would stick posters of on their walls!   Ones that woman would think were gorgeous.

 

Marek Reichman is not delivering those designs.   That is your problem at Aston Martin.   Too many disasters have gone in to production with this failed designer and too many more planned.   To keep repeating the same and expecting different results is a sign of insanity.

 

If Palmer will not sack Reichman then Aston also needs a new CEO.

 

 

Exactly mate, no one batted an eyelid when the DB7 came out with an ancient Jaguar (XJS) platform, with a equally ancient Jaguar lump of an engine. Why, because it was beautiful. 

24 March 2020

In 20 years time we'll all look back at these monster engines as dinosaurs. We'll look at the complexity of ICE units as absurd compared to simplicity of electric motors. We'll wonder why so much effort in design & engineering was put into something that only lasted for the maximum of 10 years!!!!!!

24 March 2020
jagdavey wrote:

In 20 years time we'll all look back at these monster engines as dinosaurs. We'll look at the complexity of ICE units as absurd compared to simplicity of electric motors. We'll wonder why so much effort in design & engineering was put into something that only lasted for the maximum of 10 years!!!!!!

 

I hope that ICE units are celebrated for their sheer complexity in future, much like proper watches.

24 March 2020

Yep, madness. You're running a company that's lost 90% of it's value in 2 years and you decide to blow the budget on building something which by the time you make it, nobody will want.

I totally agree, I love the ICE but to spend money now creating a new one is madness, the future is electric and in the present there's any number of decent engines about.

24 March 2020

If Aston Martin is producing its own V12 engine and now a V6, I'm at a loss as to why they haven't developed their own V8 instead of using AMG's engines. Surely a company of Aston Martin's ability could have derived a V8 out of either of its own 2 engines, especially if they were designed as modular items meaning they could be built on the same line and share some components. And is this new V6 bespoke or a derivative of their existing V12? 

wmb

24 March 2020
Saucerer wrote:

If Aston Martin is producing its own V12 engine and now a V6, I'm at a loss as to why they haven't developed their own V8 instead of using AMG's engines. Surely a company of Aston Martin's ability could have derived a V8 out of either of its own 2 engines, especially if they were designed as modular items meaning they could be built on the same line and share some components. And is this new V6 bespoke or a derivative of their existing V12? 

...but I think, by building the V6, Aston is attempting to get ahead of the curve and future proofing for the short term (say next five-ten years). Having a hybridized V6 that will replace the Mercedes V8 and, in theory and/or eventually, their 12 cylinder, as well as be emissions compliant for the next several years, would be a safe bet for them. I think the thought going forward with MB, is that they will be replacing their souped V8's with even more powerful V6's! AM's contract with MB may only be with the V8's and systems associated with them. While they could shadow Mercedes, Benes efforts seem to be more incremental as they balance their powertrain applications with their BEV development over the next several years. It appears that Aston Martin may want/need a power plant that they can use in several different applications and states of tone, serve a number of vehicle types and be in use for maybe throughout the next decade; with only modest updates because much of the engineering work was done up front!  

24 March 2020

What you write does not make sense with those!!!!!!

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