Volkswagen Tiguan rival gains 48V mild hybrid diesel variant, cleaner 1.6-litre diesel engine and new infotainment, along with small design changes
23 May 2018

UK pricing and spec details of the updated Kia Sportage SUV have been revealed.

The mid-sized SUV is available to order now. It's priced from £20,305 for the 1.6-litre petrol in entry-level 1 spec, rising to £31,645 for the 1.6-litre diesel GT-Line S.

The new base price represents an £1100 increase over the outgoing Sportage, but the cheapest model now features a 7.0in touchscreen infotainment system with a rear-view camera, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto and a DAB radio as standard.

Spec 2 (from £22,405) and above add features including sat-nav with TomTom connected services, lane-keeping assistance, automatic high beam and heated front seats.

A new Edition 25 trim has been added to celebrate 25 years of the Sportage, too. Priced at £25,655 with the 1.6-litre petrol engine, it features part-leather upholstery, free premium paint, keyless entry, an upgraded sound system and a new 8.0in touchscreen infotainment system with sat-nav.

Our Verdict

Fourth-generation Kia Sportage

Updated Kia Sportage aims to take its popular crossover appeal upmarket

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Spec 4 (from £27,260) adds to that full-leather upholstery, a panoramic sunroof, electrically adjustable seats, a heated steering wheel and a new 360deg camera. Automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection is also standard.

GT-Line S (from £31,645) spec tops out the range, with adaptive cruise control that can operate in stop-start traffic, ventilated front seats, LED headlights and wireless smartphone charging.

Styling revisions for the Sportage are subtle but include redesigned headlights, a new front bumper with gloss black or chrome foglight housings and revised skidplates. At the rear, new C-shaped LED lights evolve the look, while new alloy wheel designs and five new paint colours also feature.

Pricing and official economy figures for the new Ecodynamics+ mild hybrid 2.0-litre diesel have yet to be announced. It will become available to order later in the year. However, we do know it will only be available on higher-spec cars with four-wheel drive and an eight-speed automatic gearbox.

Featuring a 0.44kWh 48V lithium ion battery beneath the boot floor and a belt-driven starter-generator unit adding up to 13bhp, the Ecodynamics+ has a total output of 182bhp and 295lb ft of torque. It's capable of 0-60mph in 9.2sec. It recuperates electric power under deceleration and allows the engine to turn off when decelerating or braking.

Kia's new 1.6-litre U3 diesel engine replaces the old 1.7-litre unit and is available with 114bhp or 134bhp. The higher-powered variant can also be had with four-wheel drive and a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic gearbox. CO2 emissions range from 126g/km to 130g/km, with economy of up to 58.9mpg claimed. The new unit also benefits from selective catalytic reduction to bring down particulate emissions.

Both of the Sportage's 1.6-litre petrol engines benefit from new particulate filters to make them compliant with the latest Euro 6d emission regulations. Official MPG and CO2 figures are reduced for the naturally aspirated 1.6 GDI, thanks to the new WLTP testing system, but the turbocharged 1.6 T-GDI variant's figures stay the same.

 

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Comments
14

23 May 2018

Would be nice to have some details on the performance and economy. That said, the mild hybrid petrol is of more interest.

24 July 2018
Will86 wrote:

...the mild hybrid petrol is of more interest.

Did I miss something? It's a diesel, is it not?

 

A few months ago, Kia were slimming the range down and now they seem to be expanding it again.

 

https://www.autocar.co.uk/car-news/new-cars/kia-sportage-uk-range-drops-10-variants-2018

23 May 2018

...for me IF the kerb weight is high enough. My annual mileage and towing requirements dictate a diesel so this is exactly what i am looking for. Petrol has neither the grunt or real world economy to be an affordable replacement for diesel for me. 

23 May 2018

4% reduction in consumption is peanuts; many folks in cities such as Rome and Madrid look for a hybrid because of incentives for parking and in case of traffic restrictions. If the fact that it can't move even a metre on electricity alone means that it does not count as "hybrid" and therefore misses out on the incentives, then it's not even worth it.

23 May 2018
giulivo wrote:

4% reduction in consumption is peanuts; many folks in cities such as Rome and Madrid look for a hybrid because of incentives for parking and in case of traffic restrictions. If the fact that it can't move even a metre on electricity alone means that it does not count as "hybrid" and therefore misses out on the incentives, then it's not even worth it.

4% is just from the selective catalytic reduction system alone, not the hybrid system. It remains to be how much that affects emssions and economy.

Recouping energy normally lost in braking has a good chance of being 'worth it'

23 May 2018

Unless I am missing something, I really don't "get" these mild hybrids. Are they just cynical attempts to circumvent legisaltion or are they something really good and it's me that's missing the point?

 

23 May 2018
Andy1960 wrote:

Unless I am missing something, I really don't "get" these mild hybrids. Are they just cynical attempts to circumvent legisaltion or are they something really good and it's me that's missing the point?

What don't you get? every time you brake or 'engine brake' slow you waste energy which is being turned into heat.

A mild hybrid slows you by pitting the cars momentum against the resistance of turning a generator instread, the electrical output of which is saved in a small battery.

Next time you need to pick up speed that recovered power saved in the battery is fed back into an electric motor assisatance so it takes some of the load off the petrol engine, the engine therefore needs to work less and so uses less fuel.

Its free fuel!   which is better free power or wear and tear on brake pads (which will cost you money to replace)!

23 May 2018
.... mild hybrid is essentially stop&start + brake energy recovery. Almost any BMW is therefore a mild hybrid. Good part of the benefit of full hybrid for a fraction of the extra cost and extra weight. But I still wonder how the authorities treat it. Apart from the odd i3 or i8, I have not seen BMWs with a "eco-hybrid" badge in Madrid, unlike Priuses.

23 May 2018

Brake energy recovery is a good thing, but with a mild hybrid like this you will only get significant recovery if you brake exceptionally early and gently; normal braking is just that, with most of the energy wasted as heat and only a little recovered by the hybrid system.

From my own experience with a similar (Honda) mild hybrid, the efficiency benefit is probably very little - probably of the order of 5-10% - taking into account that the car would be slighly lighter without it.

Despite this I am a fan. Any energy recovery is better than nothing, and even a mild hybrid can contribute quite a bit to low speed torque which is always useful.   

23 May 2018
LP in Brighton wrote:

Brake energy recovery is a good thing, but with a mild hybrid like this you will only get significant recovery if you brake exceptionally early and gently; normal braking is just that, with most of the energy wasted as heat and only a little recovered by the hybrid system.

From my own experience with a similar (Honda) mild hybrid, the efficiency benefit is probably very little - probably of the order of 5-10% - taking into account that the car would be slighly lighter without it.

Despite this I am a fan. Any energy recovery is better than nothing, and even a mild hybrid can contribute quite a bit to low speed torque which is always useful.   

I have a full hybrid, I don't know how much I recover overall but its not just from 'exceptionally early and gentle braking'. Under any braking I see my power meter shoot into hard charging and a very hefty current fed to the battery, the mechanical brakes acting to supplement the substantial regenerative braking if needed rather than take over. A slow down at the bottom of a hill can easily add 1 mile worth of EV running charge.

The sort of system on the Kia will be more limited, I suspect the generator won't be very powerful and the rate of current the small battery can take not big so limiting the braking power, but I am sure Kia wouldn't bother if it wasn't a worthwhile gain.  

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