Currently reading: Ford Fiesta mild hybrid on sale from £19,860
First electrified version of the UK's favourite supermini gets fuel efficiency gains and emissions improvements
Tom Morgan, deputy digital editor
News
2 mins read
8 June 2020

The Ford Fiesta supermini can now be ordered with a mild-hybrid powertrain for the first time, promising efficiency gains of up to 5%.

Available in 122bhp and 153bhp power outputs, the new hybrid system uses a 48V belt-driven starter/generator and relies on regenerative braking to charge a lithium ion battery. It is able to provide an additional 15lb ft of peak torque to Ford's 1.0-litre Ecoboost petrol engine, as well as provide assistance at lower speeds to reduce CO2 emissions and improve fuel efficiency. 

Ford claims the 122bhp Ecoboost Hybrid is capable of 109g/km of CO2 and 52.3mpg on the WLTP test cycle, an improvement of around 5% compared with the non-hybrid engine.

A larger turbocharger has been fitted and the engine's compression ratio lowered, allowing for more power while the belt-driven starter motor mitigates turbo-lag, and Ford's stop-start system is now able to function while coasting at speeds of below 15mph.

All versions of the 2020 Fiesta have received technology upgrades, including active braking for the Cross Traffic Alert system, a relocated subwoofer for the optional B&O Play sound system for greater luggage space, and new Sport and Trail drive modes for the Fiesta Active. Fiesta Active and ST-Line variants also get a perpendicular park function for the active park assist.

Mild-hybrid models begin with the Titanium trim level, with prices starting from £19,860. A 93bhp 1.0-litre petrol is still available as the entry-level engine, while the non-hybrid 123bhp model can now be equipped with a seven-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission. Deliveries are expected to begin towards the end of the year.

The mild-hybrid Fiesta is part of Ford's commitment to electrifying its entire passenger car range in Europe, with 18 models expected to be on sale by the end of 2021, although a full plug-in hybrid Fiesta is not currently part of the plan announced publicly. 

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Mikey C 9 June 2020

I can't help thinking that

I can't help thinking that these mild hybrids mainly exist for marketing purposes, so that the manufacturers can boast about their range of hybrid cars...

Antony Riley 8 June 2020

Seems like a lot of tech but

Seems like a lot of tech but not much gain in overall MPG  or emissions So whats th point probable so Ford can say we are up there in the electric assistance of the petrol engine ,

LP in Brighton 8 June 2020

Half hearted hybrid

I'm of the view that if you're going to have a hybrid it may as well be a proper one like the forthcoming new Toyota Yaris or Honda Jazz models. Mild hybrids like the Fiesta here capture and deploy so little energy that any performnce or economy  gain is largely incidental . 

That said, with a starter generator replacing the traditional starter motor and alternator and low capacity battery, the added cost (and weight) should be small. The large premium here probably has more to do with market positioning and associated trim and eqipment level.  

artill 8 June 2020

LP in Brighton wrote:

LP in Brighton wrote:

I'm of the view that if you're going to have a hybrid it may as well be a proper one like the forthcoming new Toyota Yaris or Honda Jazz models. Mild hybrids like the Fiesta here capture and deploy so little energy that any performnce or economy  gain is largely incidental . 

That said, with a starter generator replacing the traditional starter motor and alternator and low capacity battery, the added cost (and weight) should be small. The large premium here probably has more to do with market positioning and associated trim and eqipment level.  

However, the new Hybrid Jazz is only 5g/km lower, and forces an auto box on the customer. Ford appear to be trying to do enough to satisfy EU rules, whilst still making a car that is fun to drive, and i suspect the hybrid system will be much cheaper too

 

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