French manufacturer will host focus groups this year to determine what buyers want from a performance EV

Electric vehicles (EVs) are becoming so mainstream that consumers now expect makers to “tick all the boxes”, such as offering hot variants, according to Renault EV boss Gilles Normand.

While there are no official plans yet for an RS-badged EV, the French manufacturer is evaluating the requirements of a performance EV and planning focus groups to find out where demand is.

Normand said a hot EV is likely to have less range than a standard one, and that there's also a question over the lack of engine sound in a go-faster EV.

He said: “Historically, performance cars have less range than a normal car, so people will be ready for less driving range, but how much less is a discussion we’re in now.

“People are also a little worried that there is no noise. If we go for a performance car with EVs, we came to the conclusion that we have to generate a nice noise artificially."

Renault product planning boss Ali Kassaï has previously told Autocar that the firm wanted to lead the way with hot EVs.

“[The timeframe] has to be short [to launch a hot EV]," he said, "because we were the leader in EVs, so we need to keep up the pace. I hope [to see one] in three years.

“We have been thinking about this for a long time. It will happen the day when the technology road blocks are removed. This means high performance but also sustainability of performance and making economic sense.”

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6 March 2020

The Renault Zoe e-sport was an incredible looking car. I'd love to see something like that on the road, or even the render in this article. 

The range question is a tricky one. Perhaps have a removable section of battery to keep weight down when the opportunity to have fun arises, but keep a longer range when needed (the removable battery could be an optional extra to keep cost down). It would also allow charging when without off-street parking (especially if charge from the removable battery could be transferred to the main battery).

6 March 2020
Andy_Cowe wrote:

The Renault Zoe e-sport was an incredible looking car. I'd love to see something like that on the road, or even the render in this article. 

The range question is a tricky one. Perhaps have a removable section of battery to keep weight down when the opportunity to have fun arises, but keep a longer range when needed (the removable battery could be an optional extra to keep cost down). It would also allow charging when without off-street parking (especially if charge from the removable battery could be transferred to the main battery).

Batteries don't work like that, they aren't fuel tanks.

A given battery will have a charge rate which is related to its capacity.

They normally use the term C where C is the rate of release equal to discharging the entire content of the battery in 1 hour. Generally the sort of batteries used in cars can deliver between 2-5C ergo 200-500KW out of a 100KWh pack. You can get 20-50C batteries for applications like drones but these will have much lower energy densities and much shorter lifetimes, there are also smaller.

In short take out half the battery have half the power

6 March 2020
Thank you. I knew that, but got put off my the article saying they think a hot version would have less range. I thought performance required more batteries, which lead to larger range. I commented late at night and assumed without serious thought that there must have been some uncommented on development that allowed faster discharging to release more energy.

6 March 2020

Its clear that manufacturers simply haven't learnt the lessons of diesel and SUVs. They listen to focus groups and 'enthusiasts' and declare that there isn't  a market. Usually the excuses for not developing a model are based around engine noise and power delivery.

Every sector the car market has expanded into has led to performance models eventually being developed and selling successfully.

The issue for performance EVs is going to be battery performance. Not for the user but I predict group tests and PCOTY tests criticising the cars for running out of charge faster than ordinary cars run out of petrol due to hard driving. There will also be the die hard who will be cutting their noses off to spite their face because they have a very limited world view if what they consider a performance car to be.

 

6 March 2020

There's hot Tesla's (beats M3's) and now a hot Porshe (deffo beat an M3), next step was always going to filter down. Besdies the MINI EV is pretty hot and nippy  

6 March 2020

Charge run down, just how long to you intend to go well above the speed limit for? (before losing your license)

6 March 2020

 So, 100,200,300miles,, would any of these figures be an ideal range for a hot EV?, and what artificial sound would we like our car to make?, there just two factors that need answered by us the future buyers of EV cars.

6 March 2020

The question is how much are they going to limit the "cooking versions" rather than how much they are going to boost the performance models. There will have to be an engine sound or once people and more importantly children start getting knocked over without any warning the government will have to introduce an "engine sound" in any case.

6 March 2020
EVs are already mandated to emit a sound at low speed to make pedestrians aware.

6 March 2020

...sensible prices, decent range, fast charging times, reliable batteries. Performance seems to happen automatically with EVs so isn't really something that needs a lot of thought to improve.

 

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