Leaf with 62kWh battery will arrive after limited edition's success, although the regular 40kWh car will be the better seller

Nissan will launch a mainstream extended-range Leaf, following the success of the limited-run model it revealed in January.

The Leaf 3.Zero e+ Limited Edition replaces the standard 40kWh battery pack with a 62kWh unit, yielding a WLTP range of 239 miles – an increase of 62.

Ken Ramirez, Nissan Europe’s sales and marketing boss told Autocar that 1000 orders were taken in the first day and that 3000 had been reached by mid-January. Just 5000 units were allocated for Europe.

“It sold very quickly, and it means we have to recalibrate our total volume expectation for the year," Ramirez said. 

“It’s not just a battery but also a high specification. The fact it sold so quickly is a good test of the appetite for this market.”

Ramirez didn't confirm the sales expectation for a full-production-run 62kWh version of the Leaf but said that he expected the 40kWh Leaf to remain the better seller.

“The knowledge of the consumer means you don’t necessarily have to have higher range,” he explained, adding that range is only consumers' third purchase consideration, behind the car's specification and green credentials.

Talking about Nissan's UK sales last year, which fell 32% year on year, Ramirez said: “Our UK performance is particularly affected by a number of elements. But from an EV perspective, we are number one in the UK, with a 36% market share. That gives an indication of where we’re going.”

Nissan is due to launch an electric SUV in 2020, inspired by the IMx concept shown in 2017, as it strives to keep its position as leader of the EV market amid a host of companies launching competitors, including the Hyundai Kona Electric and Kia e-Niro.

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11

22 February 2019

May as well make it the only power pack.

22 February 2019

But it comes at a price, around £5000 more from what I've read. That being the case, it's good to have choice. Buy the 40kWh one if it's being used for predominantly short journeys and the 62kWh one if you regularly do longer trips.

Either way, I'd like some reassurance that the current Leaf will retain its value better than the previous model did. Most of the cost saving associated with running an EV (versus a petol or diesel) has been offset by crippling depreciation. 

22 February 2019

Why dies a 55% increase in battery capacity only increase range by 35%? Am I missing something?

22 February 2019

Physics 101? Heavier battery pack saps some of the extra juice available. 

22 February 2019
Stonkintime wrote:

Physics 101? Heavier battery pack saps some of the extra juice available. 

Not quite, but thanks for the sarcasm.

I was being dim.  The standard 40kWh battery carries themselves AND the rest of the car 177miles, increasing the battery capacity would increase the weight of the battery, but the rest of the car remains the same weight and thus the battery capacity to overall weight ratio would increase at a lesser ratio than the overly simplistic 55% increase in battery capacity I initially suggested.

 

 

So  

23 February 2019

In other words, err,the heavier battery pack saps more of the available juice. Physics101. 

23 February 2019
Stonkintime wrote:

In other words, err,the heavier battery pack saps more of the available juice. Physics101. 

No, its the weight of the rest of the car that is the factor here. The heavier battery pack doesnt 'sap more of the juice', unless for some reason they fit a less energy dense one. 

23 February 2019
Why do you insist on embarrassing yourself?

24 February 2019
Car + battery pack = heavy car.
Car + heavier battery pack = heavier car.
Does that explain it...?

24 February 2019
Not wishing to get embroiled in the heavy car debate. But it's a bit more complex than just that. More energy is required to accelerate a heavier car but the benefit of an ev is that a lot can be recouped by regen. Also the energy used by a car at a steady speed isn't effected by weight. There is also a huge influence on efficiency by the drive train. Nissan I feel are behind the curve on efficiency if you compare to the Hyundai Kona which is achieving 292 miles on WLTP.
I also think that Nissan are kidding themselves when they say range isn't that important to drivers. With our poor charging infrastructure and the fact that even WLTP is optimistic for real world winter range, we need all the range we can get.

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