External independent test firm blamed for failing to apply correct WLTP procedures
Jim Holder
30 November 2018

The official range of the electric Kia e-Niro has been downgraded after the firm discovered a external test agency hadn't followed correct procedures for the Worldwide Harmonised Light Vehicle Test Procedure (WLTP).

As a result, the higher-spec 64kWh e-Niro now has an official range of 282 miles rather than 301 miles, while the 39.2 kWh e-Niro is rated at 179 miles rather than 193 miles.

All new cars to be sold in the European Union are subject to the WLTP test procedure, which was introduced this autumn. Kia says that the independent organisation overseeing the test process accidentally provided an incorrect testing methodology and then approved the results it generated.

This led to the e-Niro being tested for a disproportionate length of time on the WLTP urban cycle, comprising lower overall vehicle speeds and a reduced energy requirement, resulting in an over-estimation of the vehicle’s all-electric range.

Kia itself then discovered the wrong result during ongoing homologation work for another new Kia electric vehicle.

The firm is now contacting customers who have bought the car - which doesn't go on sale in the UK until early 2019 - to explain the changes.

It is not currently clear if the related Hyundai Kona electric, or any other vehicles tested by the agency, will be similarly effected.

In independent Real Range testing by What Car?, conducted on its own test route, the  64kWh Kia e-Niro achieved the second equal highest range of any electric car to date, recording a range of 253 miles. That was matched by the Jaguar I-Pace.

The Hyundai Kona recorded the highest Real Range, at 259 miles.

Our Verdict

Kia e-Niro 2019 road test review - hero front

Award-winning, in-demand crossover marks Kia’s true arrival into the EV market

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Comments
14

30 November 2018

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

30 November 2018
To be fair, the Kia error was on the part of an external testing agency, whereas VW's sons were knowing and internally-committed.

1 December 2018
sidevalve wrote:

To be fair, the Kia error was on the part of an external testing agency, whereas VW's sons were knowing and internally-committed.

And of course VW spent 6 months or so denying they had cheated, only finally admitting it when the American authorities threatened to withdraw the licences to allow VW to sell its cars there.

30 November 2018

You're quite correct. An external agency made an error.  Kia themselves corrected this.  VW intentionally made efforts over many years to deceive the results of tests, others had to uncover this against the might of VW.

30 November 2018
scotty5 wrote:

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

Sweet Jesus you have no idea what your taking about. I will not explain vw's utter cheat.......again. To my knowledge no other manufacturer blatantly cheated to the same extent as vw. 11000000 cars,

1 December 2018
scotty5 wrote:

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

As soon as Kia became aware of the error made by an external agency they corrected it and contacted all the people who have ordered one. Totally different atitude to VW. 

"Pressurised container: May burst if heated"

1 December 2018

scottie VW lied which their top brass all knew about  thats why some of their top brass are inprisoned . Kia  are not in the same situation

1 December 2018
scotty5 wrote:

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

You didn’t read the article did you?

Well done Kia for noticing the error, and taking action and informing customers.

1 December 2018
scotty5 wrote:

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

Kia admitted the mistake as soon as discovered. VW tried to cover it up.

1 December 2018
The Apprentice wrote:

scotty5 wrote:

Whilst VW cheats, Kia make errors.

Kia admitted the mistake as soon as discovered. VW tried to cover it up.

Exactly, theres a MASSIVE difference.

XXXX just went POP.

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