S6 released in saloon and estate form alongside S7 Sportback, all featuring an electric compressor and 48V tech
11 April 2019

Audi has released the first images and technical details of the new S6 and S7 Sportback models, with no teasers or build-up. 

The range-topping versions of the latest A6 and A7 have switched from V8 petrol power to use a V6 diesel unit mated to an electric compressor and 48V mild-hybrid system. 

Producing 345bhp in all forms, the new engine is nearly 100bhp less powerful than the eight-cylinder unit in the old S6 and S7. It counters with significantly more torque, putting out a peak of 516lb ft at 2500rpm. 

The electric compressor, also used in the V8 diesel Audi SQ7, is utilised to fill any torque gaps at low revs before the turbo can spool up. Responding in 250 milliseconds, it works up to an engine speed of 1650rpm and spins up to 70,000rpm.

The result is a 0-62mph time of 5.0sec in the S6 saloon, increasing by a tenth of a second in the S6 Avant and S7 Sportback. The top speed is, as usual, limited to 155mph. 

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Using the now-familiar 48V mild-hybrid system found on lesser A6s and A7s, which allows energy recovery under acceleration and stop-start operation below 14mph, the S6 and S7 promise between 43 and 46mpg depending on bodystyle, wheel and tyre choice. CO2 emissions go as low as 164g/km depending on spec.

The S6 and S7’s chassis receives specific sports suspension with adaptive damping and a 20mm lower ride height (10mm lower on S7), with the option of more comfort-focused adaptive air suspension instead. All-wheel steering is also an option, while quattro all-wheel drive is standard.

In keeping with the more subtle nature of S models compared with RS variants, styling tweaks are subtle and include quad tailpipes at the rear, tweaks to the bumpers front and rear and 20in wheels. S badging and a redesigned grille also feature, while the interior includes sports seats and new trim material options. 

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Comments
21

11 April 2019

love the looks of it looks so neat and up-market.

come on audi give us more, give us a new S1, PLEASE.

11 April 2019

inside and out, cost savings by removing physical buttons and replacing them with touch screens, coupled with price increases and "look at the tech" hype, its the same tech thats available in a Skoda for much cheaper.  

However swithing the top spec versions from a V8 petrol to a V6 dirty diesel is a big mistake.. 

11 April 2019

Does fitting a diesel make it more desirable. Not to me for sure. It will be interesting to see if it fits with buyers of quick Audis however. 

11 April 2019

Boring design... more of the same  .. all the chavs will slobber of this as usual..

jer

11 April 2019

Diesels and petrol getting confusing at Audi. Sort of like the car but is more like the 400d merc.

11 April 2019
It's the cleanest it's ever been, pulls like a freight loco, gives good mpg and won't need charging up every 220 miles. What's not to like?

11 April 2019

Bet it will sound great!

No wait...

I hope there will still be a petrol option?

The new diesels are just ticking time bombs for expensive problems down the line.

All the technology in the world can't solve the fact that diesel is a dirty fuel. Cue expensive clogged DPF's, EGR's and Adblue problems down the line...

11 April 2019
fhp111 wrote:

Bet it will sound great!

No wait...

I hope there will still be a petrol option?

The new diesels are just ticking time bombs for expensive problems down the line.

All the technology in the world can't solve the fact that diesel is a dirty fuel. Cue expensive clogged DPF's, EGR's and Adblue problems down the line...

Many new petrol engines now also have DPFs, and they have had egr valves for over two decades. These systems may well cause problems, but it would be good if people making comments understood the technology in the cars before commenting.

12 April 2019
armstrm wrote:

fhp111 wrote:

Bet it will sound great!

No wait...

I hope there will still be a petrol option?

The new diesels are just ticking time bombs for expensive problems down the line.

All the technology in the world can't solve the fact that diesel is a dirty fuel. Cue expensive clogged DPF's, EGR's and Adblue problems down the line...

Many new petrol engines now also have DPFs, and they have had egr valves for over two decades. These systems may well cause problems, but it would be good if people making comments understood the technology in the cars before commenting.

Some petrol cars do have a GDF (mainly Direct injection ones) they're expected to be way cheaper ($50) and alot simpler, more compact and last longer. 

Also, Mostly a fit and forget device without a 2 way ssytem to go wrong give warning etc.

But it would be good if people making comments understood the technology in the cars before commenting.  

12 April 2019
xxxx wrote:

Some petrol cars do have a GDF (mainly Direct injection ones) they're expected to be way cheaper ($50) and alot simpler, more compact and last longer. 

Also, Mostly a fit and forget device without a 2 way ssytem to go wrong give warning etc.

But it would be good if people making comments understood the technology in the cars before commenting.  

In order to higher efficiency from petrol engines, many manufacturers are producing direct injection petrol engines, so it is not just "some".

It is true that these filters are simpler and expected to last longer, but expectations do not always match relaity. Time will tell, and it is certainly not a fact at present.

To claim that I am commenting without knowing what I am talking about is a nonsense. I was pointing out that the statement critisising that diesels having to have to particulate filters and egr valves, implying that petrol engines don't was false. Many petrol engines are going to have particulate filters and almost all have egr valves.

It could also be suggested that the diesel emissions systems have now been around for a while and have had most of their problems ironed out.

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