Currently reading: Audi reveals new S6 and S7 Sportback with 345bhp V6 diesel
S6 released in saloon and estate form alongside S7 Sportback, all featuring an electric compressor and 48V tech
News
2 mins read
11 April 2019

Audi has released the first images and technical details of the new S6 and S7 Sportback models, with no teasers or build-up. 

The range-topping versions of the latest A6 and A7 have switched from V8 petrol power to use a V6 diesel unit mated to an electric compressor and 48V mild-hybrid system. 

Producing 345bhp in all forms, the new engine is nearly 100bhp less powerful than the eight-cylinder unit in the old S6 and S7. It counters with significantly more torque, putting out a peak of 516lb ft at 2500rpm. 

The electric compressor, also used in the V8 diesel Audi SQ7, is utilised to fill any torque gaps at low revs before the turbo can spool up. Responding in 250 milliseconds, it works up to an engine speed of 1650rpm and spins up to 70,000rpm.

The result is a 0-62mph time of 5.0sec in the S6 saloon, increasing by a tenth of a second in the S6 Avant and S7 Sportback. The top speed is, as usual, limited to 155mph. 

Using the now-familiar 48V mild-hybrid system found on lesser A6s and A7s, which allows energy recovery under acceleration and stop-start operation below 14mph, the S6 and S7 promise between 43 and 46mpg depending on bodystyle, wheel and tyre choice. CO2 emissions go as low as 164g/km depending on spec.

The S6 and S7’s chassis receives specific sports suspension with adaptive damping and a 20mm lower ride height (10mm lower on S7), with the option of more comfort-focused adaptive air suspension instead. All-wheel steering is also an option, while quattro all-wheel drive is standard.

In keeping with the more subtle nature of S models compared with RS variants, styling tweaks are subtle and include quad tailpipes at the rear, tweaks to the bumpers front and rear and 20in wheels. S badging and a redesigned grille also feature, while the interior includes sports seats and new trim material options. 

Back to top

Join the debate

Comments
21
Add a comment…
www.Naagin.in 10 June 2019

Naagin 4

Watch Online Desi Indian TV Shows Starplus Colors TV Sony Zee TV Download Full Episode Today

Naagin 4

QuestionEverything 13 April 2019

Observations.....

Expect Lexus to copy those LEDs for their cars' facelifts in the future.

Audi have made a huge error in their dashboard design. Any decent ergonomist will tell you that you should have physical switches (preferably rotary controls) for things like temperature & audio controls. Touchscreens have their place but not for things you often have to use whilst driving. It could be highly dangerous. It's like they're trying to appeal to those that like Teslas. It's a huge step backwards. I think it should be a legal requirement to have certain physical controls.

Cobnapint 12 April 2019

@TheDriver

Why are you disappointed they've introduced a diesel? It's the perfect engine for a big heavy chief exec car like this. As long as it gets a run every couple of weeks the DPF won't be an issue.
TheDriver 12 April 2019

Simple

I’m well aware of the suitability of diesels in certain applications, and appreciate how much cleaner their emissions have become since Euro 6. Blame my age, but a big petrol V8 will always be be absolute favourite for sound, refinement and ability to achieve higher revs (when in the mood) than equivalent diesels. Whether petrol or diesel, I also know that legislators will ensure the era of big capacity V8 engines will gradually come to a close except, perhaps, for the most highly priced cars. 

I’m increasingly drawn to hybrid vehicles and would rather Audi had marketed an S6 with, say, a petrol V6 and strong hybrid electric boost. This would offer the prospect of refinement, very high performance, and emissions-free running in towns and cities. Our unpredictable legislators may yet turn the screws even more against diesels, and I’m not prepared to take that risk for residual value some years down the line.

Cobnapint 13 April 2019

So, in summary

TheDriver wrote:

I’m well aware of the suitability of diesels in certain applications, and appreciate how much cleaner their emissions have become since Euro 6. Blame my age, but a big petrol V8 will always be be absolute favourite for sound, refinement and ability to achieve higher revs (when in the mood) than equivalent diesels. Whether petrol or diesel, I also know that legislators will ensure the era of big capacity V8 engines will gradually come to a close except, perhaps, for the most highly priced cars. 

I’m increasingly drawn to hybrid vehicles and would rather Audi had marketed an S6 with, say, a petrol V6 and strong hybrid electric boost. This would offer the prospect of refinement, very high performance, and emissions-free running in towns and cities. Our unpredictable legislators may yet turn the screws even more against diesels, and I’m not prepared to take that risk for residual value some years down the line.

You're not really disappointed that they've gone with diesel, you're disappointed that they haven't wacked a great big petrol V8 in the front.