Planned sports cars axed as Italian brand rationalises future line-up plans in preparation for FCA and PSA merger
1 November 2019

Alfa Romeo’s future product plans have been slashed, according to the brand’s third-quarter earnings report – with the proposed new GTV and 8C sports cars axed.

FCA boss Mike Manley told investors during a conference call that Alfa’s portfolio plan has been “significantly scaled back, with a corresponding reduction in capital spending”. 

The plan was quietly released in a financial results presentation to investors yesterday (Thursday) and discussed during an earnings call today. It appears to show that the Italian brand’s range has been ‘rationalised’ down to four future models: replacements for the Giulia and Stelvio, the Tonale and a new smaller  'B-SUV', which has yet to be detailed. 

This means the new GTV coupé and 8C replacement, announced in a five-year plan in June 2018, have been shelved or pushed back, alongside a rumoured BMW 5 Series saloon rival to sit above the Giulia. It's not yet clear if these models have been delayed or shelved entirely, but all signs point to the latter for the time being. 

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Last year's five-year plan was drawn up under the leadership of former FCA boss Sergio Marchionne, who passed away last year. Since taking the reins, Manley has changed tack, responding to significant losses posted by Alfa and FCA's wider European arm.

It's likely that the decision to cut spending on Alfa Romeo's future line-up is influenced by the recently announced merger between FCA and the PSA Group, which was confirmed shortly before the financial results were released. The merger creates the fourth-largest car-making group in the world, but PSA CEO Carlos Tavares – who is set to be named CEO of the new merged group – is famed for bringing in wide-ranging cost-cutting measures to increase efficiency and profits.

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Comments
24

1 November 2019

FCA seems like the 21st century equivalent of BMC.  A load of fantastic marques, with rich history, ruined by inconsistent frequently changing 'long term' plans and woeful under investment.  How much longer until we see Fiat, Lancia and Alfa disappear completely in the same way as their 70s/80s equivalents Austin, Rover and Triumph?

1 November 2019
Curtholr wrote:

FCA seems like the 21st century equivalent of BMC.  A load of fantastic marques, with rich history, ruined by inconsistent frequently changing 'long term' plans and woeful under investment.  How much longer until we see Fiat, Lancia and Alfa disappear completely in the same way as their 70s/80s equivalents Austin, Rover and Triumph?

Quite correct, multiplying bad and bad equals bad. Unfortunately, the mathematical rule of multiplying negative numbers is not valid here. 

1 November 2019

Because before the merger they were totally going to happen. Like, definitely totally absolutely yes sir guaranteed no doubts about it.

 

I truly hope that PSA can bring a significant reduction in the ridiculous " future plans presentations " that FCA was so prone to do.

1 November 2019

While it may make financial sense, it's BORING!  Fast Alfas are always a good thing.

1 November 2019

The Giulietta doesn't appear on the planned portfolio, but neither is it mentioned as something axed. I'd love to see a new model with Giulia styling.

1 November 2019
Andy_Cowe wrote:

The Giulietta doesn't appear on the planned portfolio, but neither is it mentioned as something axed. I'd love to see a new model with Giulia styling.

The car has been effectively axed. The replacement was supposed to use the Guilia platform and thus be rwd. But since they’ve axed the GTV, also using the new platform, I repeat my theory is that they want to revert to fwd for new cars/replacements.

Both Alfa and Maserati seem in trouble now. I would love to buy a new Golf class Alfa, but my guess it would be at least 2 years away, by which time it would be too little too late - as it would have to offer a hybrid variant - and I don’t they have the wherewithal to do it.

1 November 2019

They’re going to ruthlessly implement cost cutting, so never mind a new GTV or 8C, chances are that all replacements for the current cars will revert to FWD, most likely based on some existing platform from the plethora of mediocre platforms that will now be available.

The GTV would have used the current Guilia’s platform so tooling up costs should have been nominal.

Once more this is the beginning of the end for Alfa. God only knows what will happen to Maserati now. The current Quattroporte is nearly 6 years old, and my guess is it’s the end of the road for the big saloon - just one example.

1 November 2019
What a sad indictment of the times to see a bunch of SUV's taking precedence over beautiful, rear wheel drive sports cars in a company's planned model portfolio. Especially so coming from a marque like Alfa.

I can't wait to see the day when this ludicrous SUV fad finally dies off for good.

1 November 2019

After decades of Fiat based models and declining sales, Alfa was starting to re-estabish their presence of being a premium brand with the launches of the Giulia and the Stelvio.  With the cancellation of these three models (GTV, 8C, rumoured BMW 5 rival) and no mention of a Giulletta replacement, no doubt Alfa Romeo will be following Lancia on the route to oblivion.  I'm now waiting for the cancellation of the new products from Maserati!

4 November 2019
chriswilkes55 wrote:

After decades of Fiat based models and declining sales, Alfa was starting to re-estabish their presence of being a premium brand with the launches of the Giulia and the Stelvio. 

Premium brand presence through design, yes, but a premium-brand quality / reliability / dealer experience equation, not so much. 

Alfa's relaunch needed a CEO who focused on such things, over and above the design angle, and didn't have one in Marchionne.  It's not clear that Tavares is much different--he's probably a better candidate to save Fiat than to save Alfa Romeo, unless in the very long term.

And I say that with the pain of an unrequited lover.  I love Alfa Romeo design, past and present.  I was very interested in a Giulia, and the initial previews were promising...but even the press cars proved woefully unreliable in Australia, and the longterm reviews in other countries didn't help.

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