Currently reading: 2021 Range Rover swaps diesel engines for mild-hybrid straight-six
New Ingenium diesel replaces Ford-derived V6 and V8, bringing enhanced economy and performance
Felix Page Autocar writer
News
2 mins read
15 July 2020

Land Rover has replaced the V6 and V8 diesel engines available in the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport with a new 3.0-litre straight-six unit featuring 48V mild-hybrid tech.

The new, in-house-designed Ingenium engine replaces the Ford-derived diesels and is available in two guises: the D300, with 296bhp and 479lb ft, and the D350, which raises output to 345bhp and 516lb ft.

Claimed to be smoother and more refined than the outgoing powerplants, the Ingenium unit is capable of up to 33.0mpg on the WLTP cycle – significantly more than the old V8. Plus, a 0-62mph time of 6.5sec for the Range Rover Sport D350 marks a 0.7sec improvement.

The introduction of 48V electrical hardware also helps make the new engine RDE2-compliant. It’s expected to be added to the new Land Rover Defender in the coming months and could be the 4x4’s sole engine option in the US.

A supercharged 5.0-litre petrol V8 in two states of tune and a 3.0-litre petrol straight-six remain in both the Range Rover and Range Rover Sport, while the latter also offers a 2.0-litre four-pot. Both SUVs can still be specified with a four-cylinder petrol-electric plug-in hybrid powertrain, too.

Also arriving is a selection of special-edition trim packages for both models. The Sport gains colour-themed and spec-raising Silver Edition and Dynamic Black, with upgrades including 21in black or two-tone alloy wheels, a panoramic roof and a Meridian sound system. A style-focused Carbon Edition of the 567bhp SVR is also offered, gaining a carbonfibre bonnet centre section, trim and treadplates, as well as 22in black alloy wheels.

The full-sized Range Rover gains a UK-specific Westminster package with bespoke interior trim, soft-closing doors and 21in alloys. It joins the new Range Rover Fifty, which commemorates the SUV's half-century with a range of retro-inspired colour schemes and script badging created by Land Rover designer Gerry McGovern. 

Meanwhile, all Range Rover models have received smartphone connectivity and air purification technology as standard, as well as a host of previously optional driver aids. 

READ MORE

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Jaguar Land Rover committed to diesel powertrains​

50 years of Range Rover: Mk1 prototype meets latest generation​

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15

15 July 2020

Aren't both of these models nearing replacement?

15 July 2020

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

15 July 2020
Mikey C wrote:

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

 

Because in the meantime they were trying to persuade BMW to supply them, which of course didn't happen. 

15 July 2020
peetee wrote:

Mikey C wrote:

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

 

Because in the meantime they were trying to persuade BMW to supply them, which of course didn't happen. 

BMW was never to supply 3.0 straight 6 engines.  BMW will supply V8 engines.

15 July 2020
Kamelo wrote:

peetee wrote:

Mikey C wrote:

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

 

Because in the meantime they were trying to persuade BMW to supply them, which of course didn't happen. 

BMW was never to supply 3.0 straight 6 engines.  BMW will supply V8 engines.

 

Just repeating the report by Autocar on the 19th July that states that JLR will source inline 4 and 6 cylinder units from BMW, no mention of V8. 

15 July 2020
Mikey C wrote:

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

Because they had a contract with Ford and this 6 pot in Hybrid form wasn't ready.

15 July 2020
Mikey C wrote:

Considering the 4 cylinder diesels appeared 5 years ago, what took them so long to produce the 6 cylinder versions?

Because Ingenium was a bit of a cock up.  There was slip on the project, JLR switched off supply of the old 2.2 and couldn't go back, so Ingenium had to be released but wasn't ready - hence the criticism of early units.  They have been playing catch up ever since, first they had to get out all variations of the diesel 4's whilst continuing ironingout the issues, then petrol 4's, now the 6's.  It's now the engine it should've been from the start.

15 July 2020

Be great if  they fitted these  to the Evoque with  lowered suspension and there you go a drug dealers wizz  machine 

15 July 2020

The V6 and V8 are not Ford engines theyre Ford-PSA engines although PSA did most of the design.

15 July 2020

They had a contract to buy engines upto Sept 2020 so kept buying the larger ones until the in line 6 was ready.  hope they do not buy BMW engines a stheir relaibility is not as good as the Ford ones for a start, although it is a  smooth engine.

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