Kia's new 48V architecture will be used in other models in due course, as will a following mild hybrid petrol powertrain

Kia will kick-start its ambitious electrification plans with the introduction of a new mild hybrid diesel model, the Sportage Ecodynamics+, which looks set to arrive with the facelifted model later this year.

Kia has now revealed its 2018 Sportage facelift. Click here for details.

The electrified five-seat SUV uses 48V architecture with a starter-generator unit. This system, which uses a 0.46kWh 48V lithium ion battery, will eventually make its way into other Kia models.

Kia says the starter-generator unit can seamlessly switch from providing up to 13bhp of assistance via a belt that drives the crankshaft to recuperating energy from engine braking.

The Korean company is yet to confirm which of the diesel engines offered in the Sportage will be mated to the mild hybrid system. The options are 1.7-litre and 2.0-litre units; the latter is more likely to be offered with the boost, in order to create a higher-ranking powertrain.

Although exact details are yet to be confirmed, Kia has said that the Ecodynamics+ powertrain also permits the use of a smaller and lighter 12V battery to power the car’s ancillaries. In addition, it uses selective catalytic reduction active emissions control technology, which helps to lower its average CO2 output by 4%, according to the new WLTP tests.

After the diesel mild hybrid’s introduction, Kia will use the technology in a new mild hybrid petrol powertrain. The electrified models will be two of 16 new advanced-powertrain Kias that are due by 2025, including a Niro EV that's due later this year.

Kia’s current electrification plans will be headed by a new hydrogen fuel cell vehicle that’s due to be introduced in 2020. Although details of that car’s development have remained hidden for now, Autocar understands that it will be a standalone model with a range of around 500 miles.

More content:

Kia aims to have autonomous cars in cities by 2021

World's first digital car chassis technology to make it onto roads in 2019

Audi Q8 shown in new sketch ahead of summer launch

Our Verdict

Fourth-generation Kia Sportage

Updated Kia Sportage aims to take its popular crossover appeal upmarket

Join the debate

Comments
6

15 May 2018

So they might take an old'ish 1.7 diesel add 48v, battery, stronger eletric starter motor, SCR rather than develop an altogher new engine which would probably be as efficient.

Never thought we'd get basic cars with base engines having additional 48v system, battery assisted, powerful electric motor/generator, SCR, DPF, Turbo and maybe even Adblue injection system.

 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

15 May 2018

This sounds like another cynical attempt to sidestep legislation such as the Congestion Charge. Introduce a car that can (maybe) do 5 miles on a charge - if you're lucky - and which leads to an increase in fuel consumption when driving on petrol/diesel because of the weight of the battery, motor and management technology.

No wonder there are plans to treat hybreds with a range of under 50 miles as a regular vehicle. Concept good - maybe the 50 mile headline is the wrong figure but the sentiment's in the right place to get rid of these cynical car designs which fail to advance the environmental issue

 

15 May 2018

It is a mild or lightweight hybrid. So the battery is small and it is used to just recovery energy during slow down and provide a mild boost for acceleration. Also the Starter Generator replaces the alternator and starter motor so fewer parts. It is a way to make a vehicle a bit more efficient without a big weight or cost penalty. Very useful for motorway and out of city use where classic hybrids do not offer much of an advantage. You need to think about what they are offering and judge it on how it performs.

As for systems adblue and DEF are just different trade names for a Urea and water solution used in SCR systems are they not?.

I would be intrigued to see how this vehicle performs in real world, it could be a sensible offering for those people where a diesel is a sensible choice. Also on sports cars could be handy, KERS for the road anyone. Replace the battery with a super capacitor could be very useful. Think of it as short term eneryg boost for low weight addition to vehicle and it could be attractive.

15 May 2018

It is a mild or lightweight hybrid. So the battery is small and it is used to just recovery energy during slow down and provide a mild boost for acceleration. Also the Starter Generator replaces the alternator and starter motor so fewer parts. It is a way to make a vehicle a bit more efficient without a big weight or cost penalty. Very useful for motorway and out of city use where classic hybrids do not offer much of an advantage. You need to think about what they are offering and judge it on how it performs.

As for systems adblue and DEF are just different trade names for a Urea and water solution used in SCR systems are they not?.

I would be intrigued to see how this vehicle performs in real world, it could be a sensible offering for those people where a diesel is a sensible choice. Also on sports cars could be handy, KERS for the road anyone. Replace the battery with a super capacitor could be very useful. Think of it as short term eneryg boost for low weight addition to vehicle and it could be attractive.

15 May 2018

Exactly! for all the energy you put into a vehicle to make it go, any other than that taken by air resistance and friction is eventually wasted as heat grinding away a layer of brake pad, what use is that! These system recover a useful portion and recycle it back into making you go again. How can that be bad?

15 May 2018

Very similar in concept to hondas IMA that also had a small battery and was designed to recover energy into a boost to give the small petrol engine the performance of a larger engine, these systems were never very heavy. Suzuki have something similar as well now. Should be a good addition and I dont see it as a cynical eco mod but as a genuine improvement as it makes use of otherwise wasted energy. I can certainly feel the boost benefit in my crz, it isnt fast but it feels lively but still returns as good economy as the jazz its based on.

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • Suzuki Swift Sport 2018 long-term review hero front
    First Drive
    16 July 2018
    The Japanese hot hatch is all grown up in terms of character, technology and price, but is it still a fun-loving kid at heart? Let’s find out
  • Tesla Model S 75D 2018 first drive review hero front
    First Drive
    16 July 2018
    New starting point for revised Model S line-up is still the electric saloon to beat
  • Vauxhall Insignia Sports Tourer longterm review on the road
    First Drive
    16 July 2018
    How suited is this estate to the demands of the business traveller? We aim to find out
  • Ford Fiesta ST Performance Pack 2018 UK first drive review hero front
    First Drive
    16 July 2018
    Latest Fiesta to wear red ST badge is more refined than predecessor and more satisfying to drive over a range of speeds than any of its rivals
  • Hyundai Nexo 2019 first drive review hero front
    First Drive
    13 July 2018
    Designed from the outset to use a hydrogen fuel cell powertrain, this front-driven crossover provides a taste of the future today