BMW has given its MPVs tweaks to their styling and a boost in efficiency

BMW has facelifted the 2 Series Active Tourer and 2 Series Gran Tourer MPVs for 2018, with updates to their powertrains and subtle styling tweaks - and the cars are in show in Geneva.

Under the bonnet, the Active Tourer and Gran Tourer get received new efficiency-boosting powertrain tech. And all engines benefit from a friction-reducing machining technique, and diesel models get a selective catalytic reduction system that uses AdBlue to reduce NOx emissions.

These engine tweaks increase power in the petrol engines by up to 7bhp and torque by up to 7lb ft, while fuel efficiency has increased by around 5%. 

BMW has also uprated the fuel injection system. The updated MPVs are now available with a more efficient seven-speed dual-clutch gearbox, with the seventh gear given an especially long ratio for greater fuel economy on long, fast journeys.

Petrol engines in the Active Tourer emit between 127 and 132g/km of CO2, with fuel economy ranging between 47.1 and 50.4mpg. Diesels emit as little as 113g/km CO2, rising to 124g/km for the most powerful model, the 220d xDrive. Fuel economy ranges between 57.6 and 65.7mpg. The 225xe plug-in hybrid returns a claimed 57g/km CO2 and 113mpg. 

At the front, the kidney grilles have grown, while the front bumper now features larger air intakes, while at the rear, larger exhausts and a revised bumper complete the exterior tweaks.

For the Active Tourer, prices start at £24,905 for the 216d – £2645 more than the entry-level Mercedes-Benz B-Class in B180 SE spec – and rise to £24,285 for the plug-in hybrid 225xe.

For the Gran Tourer, prices start at £27,705 for 216d and top out at £34,820 for the 220d xDrive.

Deliveries of both updated models begin in May. 

Read more

BMW 2 Series Active Tourer review

BMW 2 Series Active Tourer makes Geneva debut

BMW 2 Series review

Our Verdict

BMW 2 Series Active Tourer
The BMW 2-series Active Tourer goes up against the likes of the Volkswagen Golf SV and Ford C-Max

BMW dips its toe into front-wheel drive with an upmarket MPV

Join the debate

Comments
18

10 January 2018

Been in a grand tourer 3 cyclinder quite a few times and VFM is stacks up quite well against other 7 seaters really well. But, here's the big BUT, the 3 cylinder engine is as rough as a dog when in this car, probably down to my expectations to some extent as it is a BMW. I had to check and ask twice if it was diesel, the Stop-Start system highlighed the problem and made me ask the question a second time. 

Save up a bit longer and go for 4 cyclinders, you'll get half the money back come resale time.

 

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

10 January 2018

Is anyone buying these? I thought the previous people carrier buying set had been taken in by lifestyle marketing to all buying SUVs these days?

10 January 2018
WallMeerkat wrote:

Is anyone buying these? I thought the previous people carrier buying set had been taken in by lifestyle marketing to all buying SUVs these days?

Perhaps people like myself actually like an SUV by choice?

I'm fed up with condascending people assuming what other people buy is solely due to marketing. Most people buy what they want, assuming they can buy a new car then they're pretty much people who have had a modicum of success in lfe, and can therefore think for themselves.

What did I need? I needed an economical car, higher up as I do a lot of narrow country road driving and seeing over dykes is a bonus, decent sized boot, reasonable ground clearance for fields occasionally (I don't need 4WD though), good interior room as I have a 5 year old son who is lanky, and carry my medium sized dog. Also I struggle to get out of low cars after I've been playing badminton as I'm not as young as I used to be.

So a saloon doesn't cut it, most sensibly sized hatchbacks are too small, estates are fine and a potential option. I don't like any of the current MPVs apart from the Scenic, but I've been burned by terrible French cars before. So I bought a Qashqai, fits my needs, is zero rated for road tax, gets 54 mpg over the last 15,000 miles, is quiet and comfy, well equiped, and is just thoroughly pleasant to own. It was silly cheap on a PCP via a broker, and nothing has gone wrong in more than a year since I bought it. It also supports UK jobs as an added bonus.

So did I fall for the SUV marketing? No, but I did like the fact it was very well equiped though and that was part of the marketing I saw. 

This BMW doesn't sell because it's boring to look at, and yes people have moved to SUVs. The new Scenic is the same, hardly see any, and it's actually quite an interesting car.

You might not agree with my comments above, but at least I haven't thrown a lazy cliche out there that adds nothing to the forum. I'm looking forward to your next incisive comments along the lines of "All Audi's are merely photocopy elargement or reductions of the same design", "no BMW drivers use indicators", "the new Golf looks like the last one", etc.

10 January 2018

I think "facelifted" is putting it a bit too strongly.

Citroëniste.

10 January 2018

Have been loaned a 218d se Auto, on B roads around Hawes it was actually fun to drive in a 90s 306 french hatch way, the ride was supple to absorb mid corner bumps but firm enough to be controlled, it did not rock either like an X1 or X3. The motor was refined and 50+ to the gallon, as I am normally a Skoda fan, I was impressed and surprised.

How come the CO2 has gone from 119 to 127 for the petrols though? Yet in the text it says it is more efficient?

10 January 2018

It's a 218D 4 cylinder and yes xxxx, it's definitely a lot smoother and quieter that a 3 cyl. I've taken 'car nuts' out for a drive and been asked whether it's a petrol or a diesel.

It goes quite nicely (it's NOT a 335D!) keeps up with any traffic and the Sport lever lets you overtake very safely. The handling is very precise and safe and the ride is good. As for economy we get between 44 and 58 mpg and Real MPG sites suggest most people get around 50. That's quite a bit better than the X1 where people get 43 or so.

The depreciation might be a problem (we've had Fords and Vauxhalls in the past so are used to it), but if you can appreciate the difference between what a car does and how it does it then it's well worth it. And NO, it's not for sale.

 

10 January 2018

I don’t see to many of these on the road don’t think it’s been as popular as BMW hoped.

Ive not been in one and I’m sure it’s a good car, but it is a very generic bland looking car, that if you took off the grille and replaced the badges with a Kia badge no one would know the difference. 

10 January 2018
Jimbbobw1977 wrote:

I don’t see to many of these on the road don’t think it’s been as popular as BMW hoped.

Ive not been in one and I’m sure it’s a good car, but it is a very generic bland looking car, that if you took off the grille and replaced the badges with a Kia badge no one would know the difference. 

I've seen a fair few in London. They look nice enough (in & out) as far as the MPVs are concerend, but  sales levels have likely been affected by the current SUV craze.

10 January 2018

Why on earth would anyone buy this at these prices when they can get any FWD equivalent from someone else, it has to be remembered that these types of vehicle are not bought by enthusiasts and this is not an enthusiasts type of vehicle so what is BMW trying to become? TBH just as well 'orf with a vauxhall or ford or peugeot or whatever. And 3 cylinder versions....wow.

10 January 2018
405line wrote:

Why on earth would anyone buy this at these prices when they can get any FWD equivalent from someone else, it has to be remembered that these types of vehicle are not bought by enthusiasts and this is not an enthusiasts type of vehicle so what is BMW trying to become? TBH just as well 'orf with a vauxhall or ford or peugeot or whatever. And 3 cylinder versions....wow.

 

You can have the 3cyl in the 3 Series as well it’s the Mini Cooper engine....

Pages

Add your comment

Log in or register to post comments

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week