A GM car that 'drives itself' will be on sale by the end of the decade, according to GM
Julian Rendell
25 April 2012

A GM car that 'drives itself' will be on sale by the end of the decade, according to the US motor giant.

The so-called 'semi-autonomous' car - probably a high-end Caddy - will feature radio-based car-to-car communications integrated into a suite of safety tech, like cruise control radar, blind-spot sensors and reversing cameras to automatically over-ride brakes and steering in an emergency.

"We can sense all these things now and if you take the driver out of the emergency situation, then accidents can be avoided and there will be fewer deaths and injuries," says Nady Boules, GM's chief engineer for electronic engineering.

The key tech for the 'semi autonomous' car is the car-to-car radio, which will beam signals about accident avoidance to other similarly-equipped cars to prevent multiple pile-ups.

Even if a handful of cars in a traffic queue are 'semi-autonomous' that will be enough to improve road safety, says Boules, because they will slow non-equipped cars following in a traffic queue.

Also important in the 'semi-autonomous' car is the integration of blind-spot indicators to EPAS steering, stability control and anti-lock brakes.

The sensors, for example, can over-ride the steering to prevent a driver pulling into the path of an unseen car.

GM's safety car will also be able to predict gaps in traffic and over-ride a driver who chooses the wrong escape option in an emergency.

The equipment is initially likely to be offered as part of a safety equipment pack on high-end Cadillac models, although the plan is to cascade it down onto more affordable Vauxhall and Chevy models.On the Caddy it is likely to add around $1000 to a $2000 to $3000 safety pack.

GM will continue to work on fully-autonomous, self-driving vehicles with a promise to launch production vehicles in the next-decade, before 2030.

 

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Comments
15

25 April 2012

[quote Autocar]A GM car that 'drives itself' will be on sale by the end of the decade, according to the US motor giant.

[/quote]

I can't believe I'm responding but this guy's an idiot. It'll never happen, not in the next 100 years anyhow.

Who'd trust a computer whilst travelling nose to tail at 70 mph. Yes I know planes have auto pilot but they don't have to worry about pedestians running out in front of them, they also have the advantage of million of pounds worth of computer on board and air traffic control.

Motor Manufactures please don't waste your time and money on this, spend it on range extenders!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

25 April 2012

[quote Autocar]A GM car that 'drives itself' will be on sale by the end of the decade, according to the US motor giant.[/quote]

All they will need then is someone who is willing to to buy it and trust the electronics.

If you do not control it why buy it, just travel by train or bus.

25 April 2012

[quote xxxx]

Who'd trust a computer whilst travelling nose to tail at 70 mph. Yes I know planes have auto pilot but they don't have to worry about pedestians running out in front of them, they also have the advantage of million of pounds worth of computer on board and air traffic control.

[/quote] There aren't many pedestrians on motorways, which is where this kind of technology would be absolutely ideal: I'd much rather read the newspaper than drive long tedious stretches of congested motorways.

25 April 2012

Not very likely we'll see this in Europe knowing how many Caddies they shift each year... these are cars for people who can't drive properly, who'd be daring (or daft?) enough to let computers be in charge??? Bearing in mind GM's "quality" past records, this is just megabillion dollars compensation claims in the waiting!

25 April 2012

[quote Maxycat]

If you do not control it why buy it, just travel by train or bus.

[/quote]

This really is for people who don't like driving cars at all. Still, it will allow the driver to concentrate on more important things such as accessing the internet or making calls. And whilst a lot of these features do have some safety advantages, unfortunately too many people will just rely on their car to get them out of trouble, and won't pay attention to what they're doing and whats going on around them.

25 April 2012

Why not a car that drives itself to the nearest council pound if you park on a double yellow line, or instructs a fine be sent to your home if you stay too long in a parking bay? If we are to accept a complete loss of exercising free will and conscience why not include a warning call to your wife when you drive the mistress to a hotel for the weekend? We seem to be reaching a situation where car companies are losing sight of the real issues: congestion being a major one.

25 April 2012

Yes, I think fully automated cars are an inevitability. There are potentially huge benefits for safety, CO2 , congestion and passenger comfort. Drivers who want full control of their cars will face huge insurance premiums, or will have to confine their activities to motoprsport and track days.

So what's the problem? Most people are happy enough to let electronics control their braking, deploy their airbags or guide them towards their desitination. And most of us are happy to jump on an aeroplane without feeling the need to fly it ourselves.

25 April 2012

[quote Autocar]A GM car that 'drives itself' will be on sale by the end of the decade, according to the US motor giant.

The so-called 'semi-autonomous' car - probably a high-end Caddy - will feature radio-based car-to-car communications integrated into a suite of safety tech, like cruise control radar, blind-spot sensors and reversing cameras to automatically over-ride brakes and steering in an emergency.

"We can sense all these things now and if you take the driver out of the emergency situation...Read the full article[/quote] Only two states are looking into this, one is Nevada, the other is California i think.

Peter Cavellini.

25 April 2012

[quote MrTrilby][quote xxxx]

Who'd trust a computer whilst travelling nose to tail at 70 mph. Yes I know planes have auto pilot but they don't have to worry about pedestians running out in front of them, they also have the advantage of million of pounds worth of computer on board and air traffic control.

[/quote] There aren't many pedestrians on motorways, which is where this kind of technology would be absolutely ideal: I'd much rather read the newspaper than drive long tedious stretches of congested motorways.[/quote]

Never said there were and never mentioned motorways. Didn't you notice the full stop after 70 mph. Please re-read.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

25 April 2012

[quote LP in Brighton]And most of us are happy to jump on an aeroplane without feeling the need to fly it ourselves[/quote]

That's what the pilot's paid for isn't it.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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