New member of the N performance range combines 'sophistication and driver fun'
James Attwood, digital editor
26 September 2018

The Hyundai i30 Fastback N has been unveiled at the Paris motor show, and the firm believes it can fill a gap in the market as a hot C-segment fastback.

The new car also introduces a number of minor tweaks that will be adopted by the i30 N hot hatchback.

Mechanically, the new model is virtually identical to the i30 N, with the same 2.0-litre petrol engine. It will again feature 247bhp in standard mode, or 271bhp with the Performance pack. With the vast majority of i30 N UK sales being the Performance variant, Hyundai has yet to confirm if it will offer the lower-powered Fastback N in this country.

Product manager Adrien Pere said that the decision to offer an N version of the fastback was to target a different audience, saying that it is pitched at buyers “looking more for refinement and sophistication, and a certain kind of understatement”.

Despite the fastback and hot hatch having slightly different target audiences, Hyundai opted against making bigger changes because the firm wants all its N models to have a consistent driving experience.

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An N car is an N car,”said European engineering boss Klaus Köster. “We want an N car to stand for everything N stands for: it’s made for cornering and driver fun.”

Köster added that a number of minor changes to the suspension had been made when developing the new car — including work on the bump stops, hydraulics and anti-roll bar settings — with the target to make it “more rounded in some areas and a bit more playful”.

"The i30 N hatchback has been really successful, and worked very well, so we did not have to change much for this car," added Köster. “But Albert Biermann [Hyundai N division boss] always says there is nothing that cannot be improved."

The ‘N’ drive mode setting has also been tweaked. Köster said that the goal was “to bring it back a little”, although he promised that the car was still stiff enough to offer “extreme” performance on a circuit. He added: "It's a balancing act, and we've balanced performance and comfort for the customer."

In time, Köster says those minor changes will be introduced on the i30 N hot hatch.

The Fastback is marginally heavier than the hot hatch while producing less drag. Köster hadded that car’s settings have been mildly modified to offer the same balance and handling as the regular i30 N.

In terms of exterior design, the car features the same front end as the hot hatch, with a bespoke grille and bumper compared with those fitted to standard i30 derivatives. The rear is a new design specifically for the N model, featuring sculpted exhausts and diffuser, and an aerodynamic spoiler on the boot lid. A triangular central fog-light mimics the similarly shaped third brake light on the hot hatch, to set a design 'signature' for the N brand.

As with the regular i30 N, standard cars get 18in wheels, with 19in versions on the Performance trim. The Fastback also has a larger boot, at 450 litres, compared with the hot hatch’s 395 litres.

Pricing for the i30 Fastback N has yet to be confirmed, but it is expected that, as with the standard Fastback, there will be a small increase over the hatch. That means a price of just over £29,000 for the Performance variant is expected.

Read more

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Second Hyundai N performance model due in 2018

Hyundai i30 N review

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Comments
13

26 September 2018

Maybe not new but if deprecation is hard on these Hot Hyundai's they'd make a great secondhand buy especially with a long warranty.

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

Maybe not new but if deprecation is hard on these Hot Hyundai's they'd make a great secondhand buy especially with a long warranty.

I'm not sure why some people think the depreciation is so bad, current values for 3 years, 30,000 miles are 52% for an i30N Performance against 48% for a GTI Performance

26 September 2018
mystic smeg wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Maybe not new but if deprecation is hard on these Hot Hyundai's they'd make a great secondhand buy especially with a long warranty.

I'm not sure why some people think the depreciation is so bad, current values for 3 years, 30,000 miles are 52% for an i30N Performance against 48% for a GTI Performance

I did say 'if... '.   Your 52% could only be an rough estimate as the car has only been out for 6'ish months.  The GTI has been around yonks and depreciation is easier to predict.

Out of interest where did the 52% figure come from?

But as I said it could be an excellent buy in 3 years due to the warranty more than anything

typos1 - Just can’t respect opinion

26 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

mystic smeg wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Maybe not new but if deprecation is hard on these Hot Hyundai's they'd make a great secondhand buy especially with a long warranty.

I'm not sure why some people think the depreciation is so bad, current values for 3 years, 30,000 miles are 52% for an i30N Performance against 48% for a GTI Performance

I did say 'if... '.   Your 52% could only be an rough estimate as the car has only been out for 6'ish months.  The GTI has been around yonks and depreciation is easier to predict.

Out of interest where did the 52% figure come from?

But as I said it could be an excellent buy in 3 years due to the warranty more than anything

Sorry, yes you did say "if" - didn't intend for my reply to sound as if it was arguing with you directly.

Figures are the latest from the RV companies, so yes, an estimate but one that the industry uses so very valid when it comes to current finance quotes

The Hyundai N's could well be an excellent buy but given the reception these cars have had, I actually wouldn't be surprised if the demand keeps the second hand value high - particualrly as you point out when the warranty has a few years remaining.

FMS

26 September 2018
xxxx wrote:

mystic smeg wrote:

xxxx wrote:

Maybe not new but if deprecation is hard on these Hot Hyundai's they'd make a great secondhand buy especially with a long warranty.

I'm not sure why some people think the depreciation is so bad, current values for 3 years, 30,000 miles are 52% for an i30N Performance against 48% for a GTI Performance

I did say 'if... '.   Your 52% could only be an rough estimate as the car has only been out for 6'ish months.  The GTI has been around yonks and depreciation is easier to predict.

Out of interest where did the 52% figure come from?

But as I said it could be an excellent buy in 3 years due to the warranty more than anything

 

ALL figures for future depreciation and resulting residual values are FORECASTS, therefore it matters not, how long a model has been available for. Many factors influence RV's when set and they continue to change, these are known as variable values, throughout the life of that and every model. The number therefore by definition, can ONLY be an estimate, but backed up by years of automotive knowledge, specifically within remarketing and disposal, to reduce the margin of error. You ask inane and unnecessary questions, because you are LAZY and have NO work ethic, else you'd have looked up this readily available information, before typing nonsense, sat on your Decrepit Sofa.

 

What do you drive, apart from your DS?. TwIT.

26 September 2018

Reminds me a bit of a Skoda VRS, going after a similar market I would imagine, those who want a family car but with a little bit of hot hatch performance.

26 September 2018

I go to a few motor shows every once in awhile and will be in Paris this year, but it seems more and more manufacturers are launching or unveiling their cars in advance of the shows. Kind of puts me off going in the future, if I can see it all online. There's something in being there at an unveiling (even this car), but they seem to want to take the thrill out of going now.

26 September 2018

To my eyes this is a much better looking car than the hatch, look forward to reading a review.

26 September 2018

 Looks like a Mercedes....?

Peter Cavellini.

26 September 2018

Shame if they don’t offer the lower powered version, as this is reckoned to be a better compromise on the road. After all, who takes their new hot hatch on a track?

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