Model's uncertain future has been an "emotional" topic of discussion in boardroom meetings

The Audi TT could live on in the brand's electrified future, according to board member for technical development Hans-Joachim Rothenpieler. 

Asked if the two-seater could fall victim to line-up consolidation in an effort to meet WLTP regulations and improve profitability, he stated that the board has been "fighting for it".

Audi plans to introduce 12 electric models before 2030, but it's hopeful that the range will include a viable model in each segment. 

"We want it", said Rothenpieler of the Porsche 718 rival, which has been the subject of "emotional discussions" taking place in recent Audi boardroom meetings.

Prospects for the long-running sports car have long been in question, hampered by ongoing issues over profitability in the relatively low-volume segment.

Autocar has previously reported that Audi was understood to be re-evaluating the TT's future, which was confirmed by company CEO Bram Schot at the recent Geneva motor show.

When asked whether the TT will continue, he said: “That’s a very good question. I think there’s a future for an [Audi] icon but I don’t know if it’s a TT. My heart bleeds when you ask that question!"

He added: “I’ve got some things cooking which could replace TT, though not necessarily directly.”

Sources have told Autocar that a future TT could take the shape of a four-door liftback.

Schot flagged the ongoing investment demands of electrification, mobility and technology as reasons for the re-evaluation.

Our Verdict

The third generation Audi TT
The first generation Audi TT was launched in 1998

Can the juggernaut sports coupé roll on to even greater success, or has Audi's icon lost its edge against more purpose-built machines?

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He explained that since taking over as CEO last year, he has reduced complexity in the Audi line-up by 27% through simplifying variants and engine line-ups but said there is more to do.

“Audi has to be really prominent in future, but electrification has to be financed. I cannot afford to be in every country, in every segment,” Schot said.

A facelifted Audi TT will arrive in showrooms next month and is expected to stay on sale until 2022.

Read more

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Comments
22

5 March 2019

(Audi already did a show model based on the TT 2) would make for a nice successor. 

5 March 2019

It surely can’t cost that much to develop a new TT? It is basically a Golf in a party frock after all. Given the umpteen MQB variants deemed viable across the VW Group, it seem surprising that one as ubiquitous as the TT would have a marginal business case, unless repeatedly publicly undermined by the CEO of course!

5 March 2019
Nickktod wrote:

It surely can’t cost that much to develop a new TT? It is basically a Golf in a party frock after all. Given the umpteen MQB variants deemed viable across the VW Group, it seem surprising that one as ubiquitous as the TT would have a marginal business case, unless repeatedly publicly undermined by the CEO of course!

It doesn’t matter if it’s based on a Golf or Bugatti, if it’s not selling it’s not selling - you don’t need a genius to tell you that. Story is the current R8 is not the success the mk1 was either - and its future too is in question, as far as a direct replacement goes. In fact the far more expensive Hurucan outsells it! That should give you pause for thought.

5 March 2019

Sad when you read an article like this, but when we look at it realistically, most of us either already own an SUV or will probably buy one in the future.

And when it comes down to it, most of us cant afford a TT anyway. Mid-priced sports cars will soon die out entirely. Those who want good sports cars will pay crazy prices for a Aston, Maclaren, etc, while those who want a fun sports car but cant afford a TT of an A110 will buy a GT86 or something. 

Cars in the middle just dont move fast enough, and they are too cheap to do in small numbers.

JMax

5 March 2019

Sad but a realistic assessment of the new car market. And even if you can afford a sports car as a second vehicle, it's unlikely the TT will appeal to most sports car enthusiasts. Don't think it has ever been a 'second' car like a weekend sportscar? It was certainly revolutionary and a breathe of fresh air when it was launched, I can remember. Was always hard to justify over a Boxster or Cayman to name but two.

5 March 2019
Of course they won’t replace it - VAG are on a massive cost cutting exercise and the TT is a niche low volume seller and simply doesn’t make the profits they desire so why bother building it? It’s not like they are a passionate car company! Plenty of SUV’s they produce to sell instead..

5 March 2019

The audi TT is the most competitive, and sleek sportscar on the planet and a very luxorious versatile car. What i dont understand is why Konessegg are selling there cars for 2.3 million well Audi TT is far more affordable. The audi TT will remain my top car.

5 March 2019

That’s better

pickupman wrote:

The Audi TT is the most competitive, and sleek sportscar on the planet and a very luxurious  versatile car. What I don’t understand is why Konessegg are selling their cars for 2.3 million, the Audi TT is far more affordable. The Audi TT will remain my top car.

5 March 2019
All the punters want nowadays is shitty 2-ton SUVs ('sports' - ha!), and they wouldn't know a decent-handling car if it jumped up and bit em. A former GM CEO said, towards the beginning of the SUV fad about 25 years ago, 'if the people want pigs, give them pigs'. Audi have simply worked out that you make much more money selling pigs to people who want pigs, than you do trying to sell them decent vehicles. If you cast your mind back to the early 21st century, the original and brilliant A2 was replaced with the first, ghastly Q7. Didn't take a rocket scientist to work out which way things were going...

5 March 2019

sidevalve I hear your sentiment a lot on this forum and am curious as to why you consider 2-ton SUVs 'shitty' and why you presume the punters that buy them 'wouldn't know a decent-handling car if it jumped up and bit em'. I ask in all seriousness because I do not understand this 'dislike' of large SUV's? I had a new customer last week pulled up in an AMG GLS 63. I asked him, 'that's a nice Mercedes you have, what made you buy it?' - his answer, ' I have never driven it, the wife drives it, we wanted something safe and she does not like driving my Aston'. Seems like a nice 2-car garage to me?

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