VW Group chairman Martin Winterkorn talks exclusively to Autocar
27 January 2010

The Volkswagen Group is on course to beat Toyota and become world’s biggest ca rmaker by 2018, according to chairman Martin Winterkorn.

Talking to Autocar in Wolfsburg as the new VW Polo received the 2010 Car of the Year Award, Winterkorn predicted that the group’s seven car marques - VW, Audi, Skoda, Seat, Lamborghini, Bentley and Bugatti - will together account for more than 10 million car sales a year by 2018.

Winterkorn also revealed that the group had 60 “new models and new model revisions” to introduce this year alone, counting special models for its far-flung export markets in China, India and South America, as well as Europe.

Half of the models would wear VW badges, Winterkorn said, including a new Passat, a new Jetta, a revised Phaeton, a facelift for the Touran and revisions for various Passat-based models sold in China. Meanwhile, Audi will show a plethora of new models, including new A1, A6 and A7 models.

Read his thoughts below:

What’s your secret for making your brands work together?

It takes discipline. You have to try your hardest, every day, to build the best cars. You must give the creators of these cars the clearest direction. Each brand needs a design strategy that cannot be confused with any other. Bentley is Bentley. Lamborghini is Lamborghini. We’re not like other car groups, who let their brands mix together.

If you keep increasing sales, won’t you damage the exclusivity of your premium brands?

We don’t see a problem. Apart from the last couple of years, markets have been expanding rapidly to create demand for these cars. We think they will again. Six years ago Lamborghini was making 500 cars a year. More recently it has been 2500, yet the brand is doing well. When we took over Bentley, people said 2500 cars was enough, but we have made up to 10,000 and the brand is healthier than ever.

What about Porsche? There have been rumours that under VW the model range might be “rationalised”…

The Porsche model range is firmly based on the 911, Boxster, Cayenne and Cayman, and it will stay that way. As a matter of fact, we are also investigating opportunities for a smaller sports car and a smaller SUV - but I cannot say more at the moment.

How likely are these Porsche models to be launched?

Let’s just say we do not usually waste our effort…

Your group seems intent on building every conceivable kind of car. Are there many new opportunities left?

Yes, but most of those that remain are at the bottom of the range. Cars like the VW Up, which you have seen in concept form several times, provide us with a brand new opportunity.

Surely it’s hard to make money from small cars?

It can be, but it’s not impossible. We have proved it. You have to sell in the right numbers, and bear down very hard on costs.

We hear there is to be a new Beetle…

Yes, it is progressing well and you will see it next year. It will be easily recognisable from its highly innovative profile, of course, but this time it will be a very sporty car. We have decided to trade cabin height for more length, so it looks much sleeker.

Does Bugatti have a future beyond the Veyron?

Certainly it does. But in any case there are still things we can do with the Veyron to keep it going - some improvements, some refinements. It is true we are also discussing plans for new models, but we won’t firm up on anything until we see how the economy recovers.

When the new Passat arrives later this year, will it continue to include a CC body style?

It certainly will. The Passat CC has been a great success, even outselling the standard model in the US. I think we have sold 20,000 to 25,000 cars in the US, and between 70,000 and 80,000 in total. That’s a very good performance.

You once predicted car weights would start falling around 2010 and they have done - by small amounts. If an Audi A4 weighs 1400kg now, could it ever weigh 1000kg?

It’s possible, but it would be very expensive. Cars need extra safety structure, and customers demand more equipment. If you accept that the main reason we want to cut weight is to improve efficiency, and there are other, possibly cheaper measures we can still take - further improvements to aerodynamics, reducing tyre resistance, cutting friction, improving engine design. We have not finished those yet. For the future, I think it would be more realistic to hope for an Audi A4 that weighs about 1200kg.

Steve Cropley

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Comments
9

27 January 2010

[quote Autocar]The Volkswagen Group is on course to beat Toyota [/quote]

Toyota's just thrown a piston:

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/01/26/breaking-toyota-temporarily-halts-sales-of-selected-models/

Given how Audi were smashed in the 80s in the US with their 'unintended acceleration' Toyota could be literally finished off by class action lawsuits in the US. What may save them is they now employ tens of thousands in the US and the US needs non Mc jobs now more than it needs lawsuits. But the once mythical Toyota has gone.

27 January 2010

[quote Autocar]If you accept that the main reason we want to cut weight is to improve efficiency, and there are other, possibly cheaper measures we can still take — further improvements to aerodynamics, reducing tyre resistance, cutting friction, improving engine design. [/quote]

- just what I was saying in response to Hilton Holloway's focus on weight:

http://www.autocar.co.uk/blogs/designlanguage/archive/2010/01/26/jaguar-lightens-up.aspx

Good to see VW's leadership are sensible enough to be not dogmatic.

27 January 2010

[quote Autocar]The Volkswagen Group is on course to beat Toyota and become world’s biggest carmaker by 2018 according to its chairman, Dr Martin Winterkorn....[/quote] Mine's bigger than yours, eh?

27 January 2010

Lets face it VW definately know what they are doing, taking what were thought of as substandard brands such as Seat and Skoda and transforming them into respected and profitable ones.

I think VW deserve to be number 1, the only worry i have is that they could end up like Toyota, being so obsessed by numbers that they loose sight of quality and their customers as Toyota have done recently, also dont forget the financial trouble Toyota were in recently due to their desire to beat GM to number 1.

As a happy VW customer i hope they succeed.

27 January 2010

[quote BigEd]

Given how Audi were smashed in the 80s in the US with their 'unintended acceleration' Toyota could be literally finished off by class action lawsuits in the US.[/quote]

No kidding. Toyota recalled 4m cars last year because of the infamous 'floormat problem', but now we're being told that the company will

"...recall approximately 2.3 million vehicles to correct sticking accelerator pedals on specific Toyota Division models. Toyota has investigated isolated reports of sticking accelerator pedal mechanisms in certain vehicles without the presence of floor mats."

Seems there's now a 'no floormat problem' as well, though whether the 'no floormat problem' turns out to be the 'floormat problem' all along will determine how quickly Toyota fall apart.

Shutting down factories and suspending sales of half your line-up in the world's #1 market must be a first - let alone a first for the world's #1 manuf.?

27 January 2010

[quote ThwartedEfforts]Shutting down factories and suspending sales of half your line-up in the world's #1 market must be a first - let alone a first for the world's #1 manuf.?
[/quote]

turns out they(Toyota) didn't initiate this shutdown, they were instructed to by US authorities.

Toyota - finished. Saab reborn. All good news.

http://www.autoblog.com/2010/01/27/report-toyota-was-legally-required-to-stop-selling-recalled-mod/

27 January 2010

By keep raising the bar on quality, which to me is more important than speed or volumes of total vehicles built, should allow Volkswagon the right to retain it's position as the World leader in manufacturing. If the very reliable Beetle is taken into account with the millions still on the road today worldwide, the likes of Toyota could never catch up on quality or number.

28 January 2010

[quote Autocar]We’re not like other car groups, who let their brands mix together[/quote]

Seat Exeo, anyone?

28 January 2010

Aiming for being the biggest should never be a goal in itself. That's exactly why Toyota's quality is not the same today as it used it be. Toyota learned it's lesson, but obviously VW is ignoring that.

Also, having so many brands i it's stable is can't be very profitable, given that 2 or more brands will compeat for the same marked, making production less profitable

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