In the wake of Volkswagen's emissions scandal, the firm has updated the CO2 ratings for many of its cars including the Polo, Golf, Passat and Touareg
14 November 2016

Volkswagen has adjusted carbon dioxide emissions ratings for many of its cars following on from the emissions scandal, but one leading academic has defended the move saying it’s a “normal process for car companies to refine CO2 numbers” .

Models such as the Polo, Golf, Passat and Touareg are included in the changes, which come in the wake of the the recent record settlement of $14.7 billion (£12 billion) in the USA for vehicles affected by the 2015 emissions scandal.

A company spokesman said: “In the interests of providing our customers with stated fuel consumption figures that are even closer to real-world driving, Volkswagen has voluntarily made slight adjustments within internal parameters for the NEDC homologation test. As a result of this, minor modifications have been made to the brochure data for some model variants going forwards.

“These changes have no impact on customers’ actual real-world consumption figures.”

The biggest alteration noted by Autocar’s data experts is the Golf 1.6 TDI with manual gearbox. It’s been updated from 99g/km to 103g/km. A Polo 1.0 MPI 60’s CO2 emissions are now rated at 108g/km where they were previously 106g/km. 

Dr Jo Barnes, senior research fellow in air quality management at the University of the West of England, said: “It’s a normal process for car companies to refine CO2 numbers. It doesn’t mean there has been any impropriety at this stage VW is erring on the side of caution with these new figures.”

Dr Barnes added: “EU regulations have grey areas that have been exploited in the past. Now, car makers are keen to be seen to acting in the spirit of the law rather than just the letter of the law. However, there is still a significant gap between laboratory test results and real-world CO2 emissions.”

Other VW models which have CO2 emission tweaks include the Beetle, Jetta, Sharan and Touran. With both petrol and diesel engines having their emissions figures updated, some models registered a decrease in CO2 output, including all Tiguan S models and the Touran 2.0 TDI 150 DSG.

Volkswagen recently scored the highest A-rating in the EQUA Air Quality Index with the new Tiguan, making it the only diesel-engined car to achieve this top score. It’s also the fifth VW model to be rated with an A.

Alisdair Suttie

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Comments
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14 November 2016
Meanwhile Volkswagen's Audi has now been found cheating not by the EU nor by the UK but once again by the US.

14 November 2016
Another contemptuous comment from the minister for negativity - Mr Fadyady. Two things may be of interest to you Mr Fadyady. firstly here in Australia (and in many other countries) VW has not contravened any laws and, secondly my 8 year old Passat diesel has done 130,000 kms (80,000 miles) without a glitch and returns around 55 of your mpg (perhaps one day you Brits may go metric)in the country and around 45mpg in the city. I will however agree with you the VW cheated in the US but surely we have moved on from that now.

14 November 2016
Fadyady is correct VW are being investigated yet again for more irregularities on more cars.

Lots of car makers make good cars these days not just VW. Many of those car makers lost sales to VW due to their underhand sales tactics. From where I'm standing at least they should be compensating not just consumers but also competitors.

14 November 2016
TStag wrote:

Fadyady is correct VW are being investigated yet again for more irregularities on more cars.

Lots of car makers make good cars these days not just VW. Many of those car makers lost sales to VW due to their underhand sales tactics. From where I'm standing at least they should be compensating not just consumers but also competitors.

A valid point, how many bought a vw group car because it's dishonest figures bettered that of its competion making it cheaper to tax and appear cheaper to run? Not something any manufacturer could prove or get a loss value on though.

14 November 2016
The correction to 103g/km for the Golf is awkward for VW in the UK as it tips the car out of the (current) free tax band and into a paid one (probably only £20/yr) but it will affect company car drivers (and companies) as there are tax incentives when buying under 100g/km cars.

289

14 November 2016
I don't think the £20, which is only for the first year, will make any difference to the desirability of the car at all.
They will all have to pay the £140 from next year unless zero emissions.

14 November 2016
289 wrote:

I don't think the £20, which is only for the first year, will make any difference to the desirability of the car at all.
They will all have to pay the £140 from next year unless zero emissions.

I am not sure but think that any car bought before April will retain its current tax rates and nit be subject to the new rates.
Anyone know for sure?

14 November 2016
..."This measure reforms Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) for cars registered from 1 April 2017 onwards. First Year Rates of VED will vary according to the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of the vehicle. A flat Standard Rate (SR) of £140 will apply in all subsequent years, except for zero emission cars which will pay £0. Cars with a list price in excess of £40,000 will incur a supplement of £310 on their SR for the first 5 years in which a SR is paid. All cars registered before 1 April 2017 will remain in the current VED system, which will not change." Your supposition is indeed correct, Campervan...

14 November 2016
Campervan wrote:
289 wrote:

I don't think the £20, which is only for the first year, will make any difference to the desirability of the car at all.
They will all have to pay the £140 from next year unless zero emissions.

I am not sure but think that any car bought before April will retain its current tax rates and nit be subject to the new rates.
Anyone know for sure?

You're right. Only applies to cars registered after March 1st (17 plate).

There is however a question over these 'revised' figures. If VW (there will be others) had their cars in lower tax bands, that means it's us, the British taxpayers who've lost out.

When the government realise this, I wonder if like the US government, they'll pursue compensation with a little more gusto now.

14 November 2016
289 wrote:

I don't think the £20, which is only for the first year, will make any difference to the desirability of the car at all.
They will all have to pay the £140 from next year unless zero emissions.

Dishonesty, blatant lies, extra costs for the buyer - doesn't matter. We just the love them in the UK anyway. The image, the badge, ooh the soft plastics ;-)

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