Owners who claim that Volkswagen's engine fixes have negatively affected their cars will have to face the company in court, boss Matthias Müller says
Jim Holder
14 March 2017

Volkswagen is preparing to face down dieselgate lawsuits, with CEO Matthias Müller saying the company is 'relaxed' about the threat from European car owners trying to claim that the approved fixes have negatively affected their vehicles.

Volkswagen expects to have software and hardware fixes fitted to the illegal 11 million cars outside of the US by this autumn. All of the fixes were pre-approved by the KBA, Germany’s national motoring authority, and are certified as returning the cars to their homologated economy and emissions standards.

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In addition, Volkswagen says it has closely monitored resale values of affected cars and that its research, along with that of independent residual value companies, proves that no owners have suffered a material loss as a result of the scandal.

“As regards lawsuits, we can only repeat that our updates are okay,” said Müller. “We have done thousands of measurements in conjunction with the KBA which show that our solutions do not affect cars negatively in any way.

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“If people think they know better then let them try to prove it and we will discuss that intensely in court. But I have to say we are relaxed about it.”

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Comments
30

14 March 2017
ahhh, the whiff of arrogance was only temporarily overwhelmed by the smell of diesel fumes............

14 March 2017
If I was about to buy a VW, this article would have just put me off.

14 March 2017
I totally see their point. It's not arrogance, they need to defend themselves to put a stop to the endless frivolous claims/allegations of damages. They have no case to answer in Europe from a strict "damages" perspective and the only way to end that is to test it in a law court

14 March 2017
I totally see their point. It's not arrogance, they need to defend themselves to put a stop to the endless frivolous claims/allegations of damages. They have no case to answer in Europe from a strict "damages" perspective and the only way to end that is to test it in a law court

14 March 2017
I take it that you haven't got a vehicle that broke down imeadiatly after the fix and VAG washed their hands of it. I understand that there are some people out there just after making a quick buck. But there are others who are genuinely massively out of pocket. And VAG say take us to court. How is that going to work?

14 March 2017
On the one hand I think Volkswagen deserves everything it gets but on the other these lawsuits seem like an attempt to extract money from the company just because the plaintiffs think they can. The tests have been independently certified to not affect the performance of the cars and the resale values haven't been adversely affected.

14 March 2017
[quote=Dark Isle]On the one hand I think Volkswagen deserves everything it gets but on the other these lawsuits seem like an attempt to extract money from the company just because the plaintiffs think they can. The tests have been independently certified to not affect the performance of the cars and the resale values haven't been adversely affected.[/quote] Sounds about right.

14 March 2017
The tests VAG refer to were carried out before and after in the laboritory. The user sees before and after in the real world. Users are seeing performance and fuel consumption issues in the real world. Also, the re-certification tests referef to don't include durability and reliability tests. VAG have not provided proof that reliability and durability won't be degraded. Some owners vehicles are breaking down straight after the fix,

14 March 2017
The title reads like VW will be taking owners to Court. The reality is that they will be defending themselves, as is their right, NOT taking owners to Court..... I'm sorry but click-bait journalism has no place on here!

14 March 2017
[quote=MikePWood]The title reads like VW will be taking owners to Court. The reality is that they will be defending themselves, as is their right, NOT taking owners to Court..... I'm sorry but click-bait journalism has no place on here![/quote] Agreed. Its a poorly written article

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