A report by the Transport Select Committee says VW acted cynically in the emissions scandal and that the Government must act to protect consumers

Volkswagen should be investigated and possibly prosecuted by the Government because of the emissions scandal, according to MPs.

In a report published by the Transport Select Committee today, MPs also criticise the government for being too slow in reacting to VW’s misconduct.

The report says strong action must be taken and proper sanctions enforced against manufacturers to deter similar scandals in the future.

Chair of the Transport Select Committee, Louise Ellman MP, said VW has acted cynically in this 'major scandal' and attacked the Government for not holding the manufacturer to account for its actions.

"UK motorists are being treated with contempt," Ellman told Autocar. "VW will only do what it is forced to do and it seems more concerned by the US authorities.

“There is a real danger that VW will be able to get away with cheating emissions tests in Europe if regulators do not act. Nothing has changed, and until something is done it could happen again."

The committee also accuses VW of acting 'deeply unfairly' by paying compensation to affected owners in the US, but not doing so in the UK. It calls upon regulators to ensure that UK owners are not out of pocket as a result of VW’s technical solution.

Ellman continued: “We are concerned that VW’s fix was developed at the lowest possible cost which might lead to increased costs for motorists down the line. We have called upon the Vehicle Certification Agency to do everything in its power to ensure that does not happen.”

VW responded with a statement, saying: "At Volkswagen, our customers are our priority, so we are working hard to deliver technical measures for the affected vehicles in the UK. We have contacted all affected customers, with around 200,000 now informed that their model should be brought into their nearest retailer to receive the technical measures, which take between 30 and 60 minutes of workshop time, according to model, and are of course free of charge.

"Close to 50,000 vehicles in the UK have now received the technical measure, a number which will continue to increase as further vehicles’ technical measures are developed, rigorously tested and then approved by the relevant transport authorities."

The committee also said that the emissions scandal revealed flaws in the vehicle type approval system used to regulate cars in Europe.

"The regulation system has to change so it is independent," Ellman said.

The EU is seeking to improve the regulations that set the rules for type approval, but the Transport Select Committee says that those reforms do not go far enough.

'Real driving emissions tests’ are set to be introduced from September 2017, as well as stricter lab tests for measuring fuel consumption. However, the committee was disappointed that legal emissions limits were not set lower and sooner, after scientific evidence showed dangerous NOx emissions could be cut faster.

The report, which has been sent to the Government, also states it does not expect Brexit to result in the UK removing itself from the international automotive regulatory system. A response to the report from the Government is expected within two months, outlining what it is going to do.

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Comments
11

15 July 2016
FadyAdy! FadyAdy! Your little mind will explode over this!


15 July 2016
Winston Churchill wrote:

FadyAdy! FadyAdy! Your little mind will explode over this!

Look it's inevitable. VW can run but they can't hide. Volkswagen has acted in a criminal and fraudulent manner. I ask you why shouldn't they be punished?

15 July 2016
fadyady wrote:
Winston Churchill wrote:

FadyAdy! FadyAdy! Your little mind will explode over this!

Look it's inevitable. VW can run but they can't hide. Volkswagen has acted in a criminal and fraudulent manner. I ask you why shouldn't they be punished?

Although VW clearly broke US law it has not been established that VW broke European law. And if you have not actually broken a law surely you should not be punished. The question of whether VW cheated the EU emission tests has not been made clear by any article I have seen in UK press.
The emission laws in the US are completely different from those in the EU so no comparison can be made.

15 July 2016
I just read somewhere that British VW owners caught up in the scandal are being offered compensation and their vehicles being bought back, while in the UK you get a free repair. Are British consumers that unimportant or do we only merit being treated as secondary to US consumers?

Very, very poor show VW and it shows what a cynical shitty organisation you are.

15 July 2016
Didn't some tests show in Italy thatthe supposed fix did not really fix but instead increased the emissions even more.
VW deserves to be punished, they traded on the green image of clean TDI diesel. Maybe they've not broken any laws in EU, but they have broken the spirit of fair competition

15 July 2016
I'd say the heightened compensation culture in the US is a big reason why Volkswagen said they would pay out right from the start. In the UK , however, the government said immediately that any increased emissions from the fix would not cost VW owners any more in tax, so it effectively gave the green light to the company to treat UK owners differently. Now it seems the effectiveness of the fixes are being questioned: I wonder why Volkswagen don't just bite the bullet and admit 'defeat' over this. Surely they could approach some other manufacturers with better qualified engineers and ask for help with sorting the problems? They might lose even more face, but it could help them get their reputation back in the long term. Volkswagen say their customers are their "priority". Unfortunately VW-gate has shown (yet again) that its the numbers of customers that is the priority rather than developing proper technical solutions for them.

15 July 2016
I do not feel that promoting the compensation culture in the UK does any good. Focus should be on getting the fix in place so vehicles are fit for purpose, with minimal customer inconvenience, and tightening of regulations and controls going forward. 50,000 vehicles already received technical measure, more to follow. That is good.

16 July 2016
Why would anybody in their right mind want a so called fix The VW Passat diesel wagon my son has is absolutely brilliant . Class actions make lawyers rich and do b all for the punters they pretend to represent. I told him to refuse the fix The world pollution will not change until China and India get on board. Never mind the US

Lanman

17 July 2016
ralphsmall wrote:

Why would anybody in their right mind want a so called fix The VW Passat diesel wagon my son has is absolutely brilliant . Class actions make lawyers rich and do b all for the punters they pretend to represent. I told him to refuse the fix The world pollution will not change until China and India get on board. Never mind the US

You write absolute sense, Ralph, the cars are no different than they were before the story broke. They are working just the same and are not suddenly using more fuel than they had been due to the reports in the media. Nobody seriously expects to get the same fuel economy as the official figures, and there had previously been no more complaints about the margin of error from VW owners than any other manufacturer. For anybody who was satisfied with their car prior to the story, there is no need to be dissatisfied now. Any difference in emissions to what had been indicated in the official tests is tiny compared to the pollution caused by the manufacture of a car, which would have been the same if the customers had bought an alternative make of car, and makes up the majority of the pollution over a car's lifetime.

I don't need to put my name here, it's on the left

 

17 July 2016
Those cars affected by this will be worth less when they are traded in. The VW brand has been tarnished by this cheating. That is why they should be fixed and drivers compensated for being lied to

 

 
 
 

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