Norfolk-based Equipmake is developing a 295bhp power unit that weighs less than 10kg
Felix Page Autocar writer
4 March 2020

UK-based engineering firm Equipmake is developing what it claims is “the world’s most power-dense permanent magnet electric motor”. 

Designed in collaboration with 3D printing specialist Hieta, the so-called Ampere motor will weigh less than 10kg but provide a peak output of 295bhp. For reference, the Jaguar I-Pace’s two electric motors weigh around 40kg each and produce 197bhp. 

The Ampere’s 27bhp per kg output gives it a better power density rating than any conventional electric motor on sale. 

The unit’s lightness is due mostly to minimal use of metal in its construction, and an innovative 3D-printed casing that is as thin as possible. An added benefit of this construction method is enhanced thermal efficiency, which means the motor can spin faster for longer without overheating.

Despite its impressive performance, the Ampere will command a relatively low list price, given its resource-light construction. 

The motor’s development has been funded by the Government’s Innovate UK programme, which gives financial support to UK-based projects. 

Working prototypes are expected to be in operation within the next 12 months. 

Read more

How Equipmake is revolutionising electric car propulsion

Swindon Powertrain creates compact ‘crate’ electric motor​

Under the skin: this new EV motor is small but mighty - like the firm behind it​

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Comments
22

4 March 2020

This university is developing this battery, and that university is developing that cell, and this institution has discovered this.

Until all this manifest into something usable I'm not interested anymore.

4 March 2020
manicm wrote:

This university is developing this battery, and that university is developing that cell, and this institution has discovered this.

Until all this manifest into something usable I'm not interested anymore.

The UK is brilliant at the cutting edge of science and technology, but has a terrible track record on turning that lead in to viable products. If we could sort that out it would help the dire productivity figures we've seen since 2008.

4 March 2020
jameshobiecat wrote:
manicm wrote:

This university is developing this battery, and that university is developing that cell, and this institution has discovered this.

Until all this manifest into something usable I'm not interested anymore.

The UK is brilliant at the cutting edge of science and technology, but has a terrible track record on turning that lead in to viable products. If we could sort that out it would help the dire productivity figures we've seen since 2008.

Totally agree and would add we have a good ability to give or fritter away our advantages even.

4 March 2020
Think of all the cutting edge tech invented by Brits then virtually "given away" to overseas manufacturers & developers. Why are we so poor at capitalising on our successes? About time we had a Government that understood long term tech investment and a City that doesn't bite the hand that feeds it.

4 March 2020

 Let's hope Boris and Co don't screw this up .

4 March 2020
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Let's hope Boris and Co don't screw this up .

Dumb political statement/view on a car website.

4 March 2020
xxxx wrote:
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Let's hope Boris and Co don't screw this up .

Dumb political statement/view on a car website.

Very dumb, cos we know Boris and Co WILL screw it up.

As for political statements on car websites, well that just hypocrisy - youve made 100s of political statements here over the years.

FM8

4 March 2020
xxxx wrote:
Peter Cavellini wrote:

 Let's hope Boris and Co don't screw this up .

Dumb political statement/view on a car website.

Is it? A switch to direct electric power from fossil fuel will take just as much political input as industry input, if not more and our politicians regularly prove themselves to be grossly incompetent on such matters.

4 March 2020
...guaranteed

4 March 2020
Loughborough University's diesel NOx reducing invention?
They all sound like brilliant ideas, then that's the last we hear of them.
Until a Chinese company buys them that is.

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