The EU will start legal proceedings against countries it believes failed to correctly enforce environmental law

The European Commission will start legal proceedings against the UK for not enforcing environmental law during the Volkswagen Dieselgate scandal.

According to reports on the Financial Times, Britain, along with Germany and up to seven other offending EU countries, will have to explain why it didn’t follow EU law that requires governments to punish environmental breaches.

Volkswagen’s use of emissions test cheat devices on its cars breached environmental law, and according to Brussels, the matter should have been met with more action from national governments.

Brussels will now send formal letters out to nations that it believes failed to uphold EU law. If the countries’ responses are not satisfactory, Brussels can move the case to the European courts.

VW emissions scandal: environmental watchdog slams government reaction

British government could prosecute VW Group

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17

8 December 2016
What law has VW breached? I bought my car based on it's Co2 output and it's claimed fuel economy - Nitrogen Oxide levels? Never heard of them until the US scandal. To the best of my knowledge the Co2 output, which our VED is based upon, is accurate. As for fuel economy...

If there's any legal proceedings to take place, it should be the consumer vs EU for inventing a system where manufacturers are able to claim wildly inaccurate economy figures. It's an abortion of a system and benefits nobody. What's the point of a system which produces an average MPG figure of 72 when in the real world, the average is 46?

8 December 2016
scotty5 wrote:

If there's any legal proceedings to take place, it should be the consumer vs EU for inventing a system where manufacturers are able to claim wildly inaccurate economy figures. It's an abortion of a system and benefits nobody. What's the point of a system which produces an average MPG figure of 72 when in the real world, the average is 46?

Spot on.

289

8 December 2016
Totally agree Scotty.....perhaps they should start with the home market first - Germany...see what Angela makes of that!

Bloody EU bureaucrats, come to the party late with a half-arse solution ...as usual...oxygen thieves!

8 December 2016
scotty5 wrote:

What law has VW breached? I bought my car based on it's Co2 output and it's claimed fuel economy - Nitrogen Oxide levels?

The 'Cheat Devices' put the engine into a lean burn mode, which not only reduced nitrogen levels but also fuel consumption. So your stated MPG / Co2 figures were also faked. Hench why VW hastily "revised" the official stated MPG / Co2 figures for the majority of its cars sold in the U.K. soon afterwards...

8 December 2016
Quattro369 wrote:
scotty5 wrote:

What law has VW breached? I bought my car based on it's Co2 output and it's claimed fuel economy - Nitrogen Oxide levels?

The 'Cheat Devices' put the engine into a lean burn mode, which not only reduced nitrogen levels but also fuel consumption. So your stated MPG / Co2 figures were also faked. Hench why VW hastily "revised" the official stated MPG / Co2 figures for the majority of its cars sold in the U.K. soon afterwards...

But straightaway the UK government said that VW owners would NOT face any higher emissions tax bills. Why did they say this? The government hould have made owners pay any deficits, then Volkswagen should have compensated those customers.

8 December 2016
scotty5 wrote:

What law has VW breached?

Specifically 459/2012/EC and 715/2007/EC pertaining to emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles. Most notably in breach of the NOx limits as laid out in Annex 1 Table 2, titled "Euro 6 Emission Limits"

8 December 2016
Our Golf achieves 42mpg sometimes 40 or 44 mpg dependant on weather etc and not the 64mpg official.the engine being 1.6 diesel is very unrefined to say the least not as good as a ford cmax my wife had prior to it.Just waiting for class action and the modifications then swap it.

8 December 2016
Send the bill back on to the German government - they allowed VW to cheat the Type Approval tests - and while they're at it add on any bill for Vauxhall pollution is they're all engineered in Germany.

8 December 2016
you're shooting the messenger - we should have responded, like the US for that matter. Sounds like you guys would rather live in a world where companies can cheat emissions and get away with it? Sure, the emissions testing needs a reboot, but how does that nullify VW's actions?

8 December 2016
Yet another example of why the UK will be better off out of this failing bureaucratic ineffective unaccountable organisation

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