Tesla CEO Elon Musk hits out at the Nissan Leaf's battery pack
11 August 2010

The Nissan Leaf’s battery technology has been called "primitive" by Elon Musk, CEO of electric car company Tesla.

In response to Nissan’s recent cost-per-kilowatt hour claims that it had broken the $400 (£250) barrier, Musk said, in a conference call with shareholders, he didn't believe Nissan has overtaken Tesla in reducing battery costs and claimed the Japanese firm was using a "much more primitive level of technology" than Tesla.

Read Autocar’s first drive of the Nissan Leaf

Musk said that the Leaf’s battery pack was not even as good as the first prototype his company produced because of its less-sophisticated cooling system. He added that the Leaf technology would struggle in extreme temperature conditions, suffering “huge degradation” when cold and not functioning properly when hot.

Tesla uses active liquid thermal control (which will also be used in the Chevrolet Volt), while the Leaf pack uses an air cooling system; Musk claims this battery technology would mean the Leaf's battery pack will have temperatures “all over the place".

Nissan supports its battery pack with an eight-year, 100,000-mile warranty. Musk said the battery cost in Tesla's upcoming electric Model S saloon would be around 40 per cent less than its only current model, the Roadster.

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Comments
43

11 August 2010

nissan warranty 8 years, 100k miles.

tesla warranty 3 years, 36k miles.

tesla are worried.

11 August 2010

don`t think so.

Bentley costumers don`t shop around Toyota dealers...

same point here, costumers for Tesla or the upcoming Fisker are in the same basket as the ones that shop M-B CLS or Maser Quattroporte.

11 August 2010

you what?

11 August 2010

[quote beachland2]

nissan warranty 8 years, 100k miles.

tesla warranty 3 years, 36k miles.

tesla are worried.

[/quote]

Perhaps Tesla are realistic about how long it will take for these batteries to degrade, and being a small loss amking company cant afford to offer an unrealistic warrenty. I guess Nissan are taking a big gamble on battery life with their 8 year warrenty.

11 August 2010

i am sure they are not, nissan are not allowed to gamble their spending on anything as forbidden by the boss, who is very bossy.

i'm sure nissan know very well the battery will last 8 years or 100k miles, whichever is first.

i think the tesla boss is worried because the nissan could take market share away from their new electric models.

i also heard recently that tesla are in big difficulty as a company as a whole. their existence could be in doubt.

11 August 2010

yeh, yo`re right with the bossy boss.

maybe the Leaf will come with the same warranty scheme as the GT-R...

the Leaf it`s not in my game, anyway.

11 August 2010

Toyota recently bought shares in Tesla, maybe they are the ones who are worried!

11 August 2010

[quote Autocar]Musk said ... he didn't believe Nissan has overtaken Tesla in reducing battery costs and claimed the Japanese firm was using a "much more primitive level of technology" than Tesla.
[/quote]There might be truth in his claim, but Nissan isn't bankrupt.

11 August 2010

From the consumer's point of view it's a comparison between two types of t*rd. Don't know about the Tesla (at their prices I guess sustainability isn't that relevant, if you want to carry on Tesla-ing you simply buy another one – very green, that) but the 'affordable' Leaf will be a financial liability long before it becomes a writeoff after five years or so when the battery dies. Its retained value will drop faster than the charge indicator on a cold, rainy winter's night. Would you buy a used Leaf after three years? Or even two? I wouldn't. Especially if I didn't know what sort of charging regime the previous owner/s had inflicted on it (which I wouldn't, because there's no loadcycle indicator on any of these plug-in electric cars – funny, that). How does all this square up with sustainable car manufacture? With current technology, this plug-in thing a massive swindle in the making and a lot of early adopters are going to get burned.

11 August 2010

[quote tonym911]With current technology, this plug-in thing a massive swindle in the making and a lot of early adopters are going to get burned.[/quote]Your prejudices are showing. You write and argue well, Tony no need to toss it away on unsubstantiated guesstimate

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