Nationwide Autocentre says regular servicing will help stop MOT failures
21 January 2010

Regular servicing and limiting your mileage, not your make and model, are the deciding factors in MOT failures, according to new data from Nationwide Autocentre.

Nationwide Autocentre, the UK's largest MOT test provider, has drawn this conclusion after analysing its own MOT data.

Among its findings are that:- 20 per cent less cars fail when serviced regularly- more miles in a short space of time will increase the chance of MOT failure- the cost of rectifying a failure item reduces when vehicles are serviced regularly by around 37 per cent

“If you run your car into the ground, it’ll cost you more,” said commercial director Mark Taylor. “The Megane is relatively cheap to fix – the average bill is just £176, but the stats show servicing reduces the chances and the cost of failing its MOT.”

Renault pointed out that the Megane was the best-selling car in its segment, with a lot of sales to company fleets: “It’s unfortunate the DfT data doesn’t take the effect of higher mileages into account as there are a multitude of reasons why a car can fail that relate to use and maintenance."

Nationwide Autocentre’s stats also give drivers some insight into the running costs and reliability of some of the most popular models.

The Vauxhall Astra’s failure rate drops from 17 per cent to just 8 per cent with servicing and the cost of repair falls from £199 to £57 on average. Taylor suspects that the remaining failures could be due to drivers not bothering with a simple five point check before the test.

“Around 30 per cent of all MOT failures are down to people not checking their tyres, wipers and screen, lights, number plates and seatbelts before the test,” said Taylor. “You’d be amazed how many people didn’t realise their dog’s been chewing the rear seatbelts.”

And it seems to be true that if you look after a VW Golf properly, it will run like clockwork. The 04 VW Golf has an average failure rate of 13.6 per cent, but this falls to zero among serviced models.

The BMW 3 Series also does well. Its 8.4 per cent failure rate makes it the best by some way in Nationwide’s books. And, with servicing, it also drops to zero.

The Ford Focus shows how much money regular servicing can save you. On 04 examples, the cost of fixing MOT failures halved to around £100 on cars that were properly maintained.

Read the Megane tops MOT failure chart story to see how UK cars fare in MOTs according to the BBC and DfT data

According to the DfT data, these were the top ten MOT failures

Mazda RX-7 60 per centMazda 626 50 per centAudi S6 42.9 per centFerrari 612 Scaglietti 36.8 per centMercedes 220CE 33.3 per centChevrolet Tacuma 33.3 per centPeugeot 407 31.5 per centFiat Multipla: 30.6 per centPeugeot 807: 29.8 per centFiat Doblo: 28.8 per cent

 

Our Verdict

Renault Megane

The Renault Megane looks bland, and it's not that good to drive either

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Comments
13

21 January 2010

So if you do a lot of miles and don't service your car, then its likely to fail! and a service company thinks its a good idea to get your car serviced regularly. This is extraordinary stuff Autocar - keep up the tremendous work.

21 January 2010

From personal experience I'd say there is an element of truth in the DOT's report. Sure, the number of faults can escalate if you don't keep on top of them, but the key issue here is that they are occurring in the first place. Renault blame the results on high mileage company cars. Well pardon me, but aren't other manufacturers vehicles also used for this purpose? And why didn't they top the league? I think we all know when our legs are being pulled.

21 January 2010

[quote noluddite]Renault blame the results on high mileage company cars. Well pardon me, but aren't other manufacturers vehicles also used for this purpose?[/quote]

Quite. Renault used to feature on our company car list because they were cheap to lease. They fell out of favour though because people were fed up with having to waste so much working time taking them back to get faults fixed. The Vauxhall Vectra on the other hand was another "cheap" choice, and was superb for the task. The 30k service interval on the diesels meant it only needed two visits to the dealer over the 3 years that we ran it.

21 January 2010

[quote MrTrilby]The Vauxhall Vectra on the other hand was another "cheap" choice, and was superb for the task. The 30k service interval on the diesels meant it only needed two visits to the dealer over the 3 years that we ran it.
[/quote]

I had 2 company Vectras and they are vastly underated cars. No excitement to be had, they just got on with the job. It was just a shame that the company I worked for insisted on annual services regardless (health and safety reasons!) and that was where all vauxhalls then fall down - the dealers.

I do think that there is an element of truth in the report though. How many cherished Renaults do you see compared to even Fords? Not many I'd bet. Most Renaults i see look well used and abused (probably because they're cheap used) and it doesn't surprise me that they have more failures.

21 January 2010

Regular services and all the TLC in the world will not prevent things like balljoints from failing premerturely.

21 January 2010

I think the main point here is that the DoT shouldn't be releasing this kind of data in the 1st place. By doing this it is advertising the better manufacturers, and could influence peoples decisions in buying a car. Its like the Labour party saying they prefer Renault's (which would surely harm Renaults sales figures for the wrong type of association!!!). Its not on at all. Its fine people like NAtionwide Auto Centre, or the AA releasing such figures, but not a government department. Mind you, they were probably able to claim a few expenses in writing up the list. Honestly, you get a better quality report when its written up while on holiday in Hawaii!

21 January 2010

[quote N0077666] Its fine people like NAtionwide Auto Centre, or the AA releasing such figures, but not a government department. [/quote]

The government released the information as it was legally obliged to do so when presented with a request under the freedom of information act.

21 January 2010

All the servicing will not stop an electrical failure which in my experience with Renaults is the most likely failure thereby potentially causing problems with most areas of the car.

21 January 2010

I think we managed to work that one out ourselves...

However, as for the Megane coming last is a bit surprising. I wonder if there have been similar surveys on the continent with similar results? Time to check ADAC I think...

R32

21 January 2010

[quote N0077666]By doing this it is advertising the better manufacturers, and could influence peoples decisions in buying a car.[/quote]

That is exactly why the facts and figures should be made publicly available - to allow people to make an informed choice about where to spend their hard-earned cash. To say the figures shouldn't be revealed makes no sense at all to any consumer with half a brain.

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