Nissan and Toyota are committed to continued car production in the UK despite Theresa May’s announcement that Britain will leave the EU single market
19 January 2017

Two of the UK’s largest car manufacturers say they will carry on building cars here despite the clear statement by Theresa May that Britain will leave the European Union (EU) single market.

The Prime Minister outlined her plan on Tuesday and since then Carlos Ghosn, CEO of Nissan, has said the Japanese firm will continue to build its Qashqai and X-Trail SUVs at its Sunderland plant.

Toyota has also stated it intends to carry on producing cars and engines at its factories in Burnaston, Derbyshire and Deeside in North Wales.

Talking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, Toyota Chairman Takeshi Uchiyamada told Bloomberg Television: ‘We can survive this. We don’t tend to close or move factories when things like this happen and it will be the same in the UK."

Nissan and Toyota, along with Honda, were attracted to the UK because of its EU membership and access to the single market that guarantees exports to other member states without tariffs.

Theresa May’s Brexit statement made it clear that Britain will no longer be part of this bloc when it leaves the EU.

The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) has previously warned that quitting the single market could harm the UK car industry by as much as £4.5 billion per year in revenue.

Several car companies that Autocar has spoken to say they support the SMMT's position and are now monitoring the situation. A spokesman from one car brand added: "There’s still not enough clarity at the moment, but the weak value of the pound is having an impact on the cost of imported models."

Car companies based in the UK, such as Aston Martin and Jaguar Land Rover, are in a different position as the weaker value of the pound has boosted their overseas sales due to more competitive pricing. Aston Martin CEO Andy Palmer said: "We support the assurances proposed by the Prime Minister to ensure British companies have fair access to all global markets."

Alisdair Suttie

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Comments
9

19 January 2017
How are the BBC gonna spin this news round?

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

19 January 2017
xxxx wrote:

How are the BBC gonna spin this news round?

Easy:

"Vauxhall, Bentley, Rolls-Royce etc. have NOT committed to the UK..."

19 January 2017
Straff wrote:
xxxx wrote:

How are the BBC gonna spin this news round?

Easy:

"Vauxhall, Bentley, Rolls-Royce etc. have NOT committed to the UK..."

Rolls Royce and Bentley, their strongest sales point is they're assembled in Great Britain.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

19 January 2017
Assembled is the operative word,built largely from imported components and sub assemblies.

19 January 2017
That's because, after the crisis meeting Ghosn held with May last year, all motor manufacturers in the UK have been offered government subsidies in order not to lost profitability on either the higher cost of imported good due to the lower value of Sterling, or the decrease in exports to the EU as a result of new trade barriers.

The taxpayer will ultimately foot the bill.

19 January 2017
aatbloke wrote:

That's because, after the crisis meeting Ghosn held with May last year, all motor manufacturers in the UK have been offered government subsidies in order not to lost profitability on either the higher cost of imported good due to the lower value of Sterling, or the decrease in exports to the EU as a result of new trade barriers.

The taxpayer will ultimately foot the bill.

Amyas Morse, the head of the National Audit Office, said he had seen a government letter to Nissan, and that it contained no promises which would result in extra government spending.

“I am satisfied there is no identifiable contingent liability,” he said in a letter to Conservative MP Andrew Tyrie, who chairs the Treasury Select Committee.

www.cityam.com/255579/government-letter-nissan-reveals-no-extra-spending-says-top

20 January 2017
aatbloke wrote:

That's because, after the crisis meeting Ghosn held with May last year, all motor manufacturers in the UK have been offered government subsidies.....

The taxpayer will ultimately foot the bill.

The taxpayer has always offered car makers subsidies to build here

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

19 January 2017
the UK defaults to trade tariffs then money generated from the UK trade deficit with EU would fund local exporters to EU, if it was required. Honda would probably be happy with a US/UK trade deal to supply US from UK plant. Swings and roundabouts.

20 January 2017
Over 40% of the UK's car exports are destined to non EU countries and this figure is growing. Brexit should accelerate that.

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