Components firm Schaeffler says its P2 module could reduce hybrid fuel consumption by 20%

German components firm Schaeffler has unveiled a new hybrid clutch system that opens the way for electrified cars to be offered with manual transmissions.

The so-called ‘P2 module’ is expected to go into production at the end of this year in China. The P2 module fits between the engine and the transmission — making it especially useful for transversely engined vehicles — and combines a 12kW electric motor and a pair of clutches. A disconnect clutch allows the car’s engine to be decoupled from the transmission. An impact clutch is used to smooth out vibrations when the engine is restarted.

Schaeffler said the P2 module would allow a car to drive electrically at low speeds in stop-start traffic, automatic parking could be performed in electric-only mode and the system also allows ‘active sailing’ at speeds up to 30mph. The active sailing system allows a vehicle to take advantage of rolling momentum or downhill stretches of road by either idling or shutting down the engine and disconnecting it from the transmission in order to save fuel.

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The new unit is designed to work with a 48V electrical system, which many car makers are rushing to adopt for future models. The 48V system means that not only can the electrical system handle a maximum of 12kW — four times that of the familiar 12V system — but also the system’s cabling can be 75% smaller, saving weight, reducing costs and improving the maker’s ability to package the wiring harness into the car.

The P2 can also be used to recuperate energy under braking, saving it as electrical energy to a 48V battery.

The P2 unit is designed to be retro-fitted to existing vehicle structures with minimal engineering changes. Around half of all global car sales are of cars with a manual gearbox.

Changes are not needed to existing gearbox designs and the unit doesn’t need water cooling like some hybrid setups. It could help reduce fuel consumption by as much as 20%, according to Schaeffler.

The P2 module is intended to be used with Schaeffler’s new E-clutch set-up, which, it claims, can help cut fuel consumption by as much as 8%. There are two versions of the E-clutch — one that uses a pedal and hydraulic or cable connection with the electronic ‘intelligent actuator’ and the other that dispenses with the clutch pedal altogether.

Future versions of the P2 unit, one developing a continuous 33bhp and 74 lb ft and the other 64bhp and 118lb ft, are also under development.

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Comments
19

7 July 2017
Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays? Do you feel like Senna in the supermarket in your Yaris? Please!

7 July 2017
I agree with manicm. Why do people insist on driving manual cars routinely? Perhaps it is different with an out-and-out sports car, on those increasingly rare occasions when you can drive it properly. My better half has knee problems which make it difficult to use a clutch so I have driven automatics almost exclusively for nearly 20 years now. On those rare occasions I drive a manual as a hire or loan car, I'm reminded that I'm not missing anything.

Plus, electric cars don't need shiftable gears anyway, so in the real electric future there will be no sticks and clutches.

7 July 2017
manicm wrote:

Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays? Do you feel like Senna in the supermarket in your Yaris? Please!

I reckon there's as many if not more manuals sold than auto's, so in answer to "Does anyone really want to depress a clutch " quite clearly yes!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

7 July 2017
xxxx wrote:
manicm wrote:

Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays? Do you feel like Senna in the supermarket in your Yaris? Please!

I reckon there's as many if not more manuals sold than auto's, so in answer to "Does anyone really want to depress a clutch " quite clearly yes!

This system is for hybrid cars. NOBODY is going to buy a manual hybrid car!

It's a solution looking for a problem.

7 July 2017
Suzuki are already selling the new Swift which is offered as a manual hybrid car.

7 July 2017
manicm wrote:
xxxx wrote:
manicm wrote:

Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays? Do you feel like Senna in the supermarket in your Yaris? Please!

I reckon there's as many if not more manuals sold than auto's, so in answer to "Does anyone really want to depress a clutch " quite clearly yes!

This system is for hybrid cars. NOBODY is going to buy a manual hybrid car!

It's a solution looking for a problem.

Why say "Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays?" then

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

7 July 2017
Electric cars accepted, I would NEVER buy an automatic, I hate them. But I love using the clutch and changing gear, even in traffic, I love it, cant get enough of it, could do it all day. When the ICE engine is no more I will really miss changing gear. A manual hybrid sounds great, I d love it and frankly so would a whole hell of a lot of my fellow car enthusiasts, many of whom also dont like autos. In fact the whole idea could help sell the hybrid concept to people who who dont like it - there are ICE die hards around who are fiercely anti electric anything when it comes to car drivetrains. It would be especially cool if it could be retro fitted to older cars. But its not a new idea - the Honda CRZ was a manual hybrid (and surprisingly good to drive despite what the motoring press said about it at the time).

7 July 2017
xxxx wrote:
manicm wrote:

Does anyone really want to depress a clutch and shift a stick nowadays? Do you feel like Senna in the supermarket in your Yaris? Please!

I reckon there's as many if not more manuals sold than auto's, so in answer to "Does anyone really want to depress a clutch " quite clearly yes!

Its not so much about people wanting to depress a clutch pedal. More like they don't particularly want to shell out more money for an auto option, so will tolerate a manual.
I see no place for manuals on electric or hybrid vehicles however.
Its antiquated technology to say the least.

xxxx just went POP

7 July 2017
hate it when people write on behalf of everyone they disagree with.
I can afford an auto but prefer a manual, however, EV are a different case entirely!

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

7 July 2017
Care to quantify your reckoning with data?

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