The majority of the company's 300 charging points are at motorway service stations; original price announced was £5 for 20 minutes

Ecotricity, the provider of the majority of electric car chargers at motorway services, will begin charging £6 for a 30min fast charge from today.

Last week, the company initially said it would be charging £5 for 20min, but owner Dale Vince announced the new cost on Radio 4 today.

A spokesman for Ecotricity said: "We looked at the response to the announcement last week and decided it made sense to offer a different price, based on the feedback we received."

The company has started upgrading the hardware of its entire charging network to accept payments from a new app, and it expects all of its chargers to accept payments by Friday 5 August.

Users must download the new Electric Highway app, which allows drivers to pay at the pump. The app also shows a live network of Ecotricity chargers to see the location and availability, and enables drivers to track the progress of their charge.

The company has 296 charging points across the country, with 99% of them at motorway service stations, but it expects to double the number of chargers in two years and introduce some to cities. A fast charge point could give an electric car an 80% charge after 20-30 minutes. There are around 20 slow chargers in Ecotricity's network, which could charge an electric car up to 80% in around one hour, and these will remain free.

Ecotricity says the usage of its charging points trebled in 2015, and in its statement announcing the original £5 fee said: "It is now necessary to start charging for the service in order to maintain and grow the network."

The move to charge for electricity could mean charging plug-in hybrid models, like the best-selling Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV, at motorway services will become financially uneconomical because of their limited electric-only ranges.

Ecotricity energy customers will be able to use the chargers for free as part of their paid-for plan. Chargemaster, a rival electric charging point company, introduced a monthly price for use of its charging points around two years ago, costing from £7.85 a month. This entitles owners to free use of the company's non-rapid charge points, which account for around 80% of its 4000 chargers. The remaining 20% are fast chargers and cost 9p per kWh, which the company says would typically work out as £2 for a 30min charge. 

Tesla has rapid charging points at service stations for its drivers, and these will remain free to use.

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Comments
32

7 July 2016
With EV's getting ever increasing ranges all this talk of queue at fast chargers etc will become less important, especially when they start charging more than Ecomony 7.

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

7 July 2016
xxxx wrote:

With EV's getting ever increasing ranges all this talk of queue at fast chargers etc will become less important, especially when they start charging more than Ecomony 7.

Surely economy 7 or similar cheaper priced electricity, available mostly overnight only, is only available to those households with electric storage heating? Is that the case always? Most homes with electric storage heaters are apartments for the elderly or rented properties surely?

7 July 2016
Campervan wrote:
xxxx wrote:

With EV's getting ever increasing ranges all this talk of queue at fast chargers etc will become less important, especially when they start charging more than Ecomony 7.

Surely economy 7 or similar cheaper priced electricity, available mostly overnight only, is only available to those households with electric storage heating? Is that the case always? Most homes with electric storage heaters are apartments for the elderly or rented properties surely?

Of course it's only available at night that's the idea of it, you could charge the car whilst you sleep for 8 hours. And it's not just available to apartments with elderly or rented properties but you do need a meter of course. Just go on the uswitch website to find out more

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

7 July 2016
xxxx wrote:
Campervan wrote:
xxxx wrote:

With EV's getting ever increasing ranges all this talk of queue at fast chargers etc will become less important, especially when they start charging more than Ecomony 7.

Surely economy 7 or similar cheaper priced electricity, available mostly overnight only, is only available to those households with electric storage heating? Is that the case always? Most homes with electric storage heaters are apartments for the elderly or rented properties surely?

Of course it's only available at night that's the idea of it, you could charge the car whilst you sleep for 8 hours. And it's not just available to apartments with elderly or rented properties but you do need a meter of course. Just go on the uswitch website to find out more

Looking at uswitch website you need to be using 40% or more of your electricity consumption at night, during your 7 hours, for you to gain over an ordinary tariff, And have electric storage heating as I said in my earlier comment for that to be realistic for most people. Of course you may use over 40% of your total consumption of electricity on charging your car or cars at night.

8 July 2016
If you take out an economy 7 tariff do you not have to pay an additional (and usually quite expensive) standing charge on top of the day rate standing charge?
Mrs Leaf

289

7 July 2016
Well that was inevitable!
I am surprised that any one else is surprised.
Of course the £5 charge is going to be dwarfed by the amount of money drivers will have to pay buying inflated price snacks and coffee whilst waiting.
By the way, how far is a 20 minute charge going to realistically take you in winter?

7 July 2016
289 wrote:

Well that was inevitable!
I am surprised that any one else is surprised.
Of course the £5 charge is going to be dwarfed by the amount of money drivers will have to pay buying inflated price snacks and coffee whilst waiting.
By the way, how far is a 20 minute charge going to realistically take you in winter?

Well it depends on the charging rate. But on economy 7 it's about 9p a Kwh giving you 55Kwh for £5.00 which would take a Leaf about 260 miles. My point is if the these charging companies start to rip you off and the next generation Leaf does 200 miles between charges you'd only ever use them a couple of times a year anyway, hence my point about it not being such a big a issue, especially once the next gen EV's come along with higher ranges

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

A34

7 July 2016
xxxx wrote:
289 wrote:

...how far is a 20 minute charge going to realistically take you in winter?

Well it depends on the charging rate. But on economy 7 it's about 9p a Kwh giving you 55Kwh for £5.00 which would take a Leaf about 260 miles..

You'll be standing over a charred and burnt out Leaf if you load 55KwH in 20mins (ie at 165Kw!). Of course the car won't take that much; Nissan say "These [motorway service stations] provide up to 80% charge in 30 minutes on the 24kWh battery"... so 20mins should give (in the constant current phase of the charge cycle) 66% of 80% of 124 miles ie 65 miles (for the 24KwH battery version)...

A34

11 July 2016
Looks like the story is still developing!

8 July 2016
xxxx wrote:
289 wrote:

Well that was inevitable!
I am surprised that any one else is surprised.
Of course the £5 charge is going to be dwarfed by the amount of money drivers will have to pay buying inflated price snacks and coffee whilst waiting.
By the way, how far is a 20 minute charge going to realistically take you in winter?

Well it depends on the charging rate. But on economy 7 it's about 9p a Kwh giving you 55Kwh for £5.00 which would take a Leaf about 260 miles. My point is if the these charging companies start to rip you off and the next generation Leaf does 200 miles between charges you'd only ever use them a couple of times a year anyway, hence my point about it not being such a big a issue, especially once the next gen EV's come along with higher ranges

For your sake, will you at least stop doing treatments that require chemicals like perms. I think they are getting to your head. A Nissan Leaf with a 55kWh battery and 260 mile range???

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