Renault has teamed up with Chargemaster and Qualcomm to produce a working demonstration of charging on the move

Renault, Chargemaster and Qualcomm are teaming up to trial dynamic EV charging at speeds of up to 60mph.

The technology, which is being trialled at the Fabric technology test track south of Paris, is based around US tech company Qualcomm's Halo wireless charging system, which is used to charge Formula E’s BMW i8 safety car.

The dynamic version of the system is said to be capable of charging an electric vehicle (EV) at up to 20kW at highway speeds – which is only 2kW less than the regular device.

Halo is being developed for 'simultaneous charging', in which two cars on the same track can charge dynamically at the same time. Charge can be transferred in both directions on the track.

Development will move into its next phase in France to evaluate safe operation and efficiency of energy transfer. Factors to be tested include practical situations such as identification the car and matching the power between track and vehicle at speed and depending on the alignment of vehicle along the track.

“Being part of this exciting project has enabled us to test and further research dynamic charging on our Kangoo ZE (pictured above) vehicles,” said Eric Feunteun, Renault’s electric vehicle programme director. “Our engineers have worked very closely with Qualcomm Technologies. We see dynamic charging as a great vision to further enhance the ease of use of EVs, thus the accessibility of EVs for all.”

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Comments
2

19 May 2017
It still needs the things to be buried in the road reading this, which given the costs and upheaval involved limit the appeal.
I've often wondered if there's a way of harnessing some kind of alternator to generate the power, using the wheel motion or motor (like a supercharger) or am I as usual barking up the wrong tree because it'd have to be the size of a jet engine?! I'm sure if it was possible it'd have been done by now.

19 May 2017
It still needs the things to be buried in the road reading this, which given the costs and upheaval involved limit the appeal.
I've often wondered if there's a way of harnessing some kind of alternator to generate the power, using the wheel motion or motor (like a supercharger) or am I as usual barking up the wrong tree because it'd have to be the size of a jet engine?! I'm sure if it was possible it'd have been done by now.

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