F1 title favourite denies using an active suspension system
6 April 2010

Red Bull has denied it is running a performance-boosting active suspension set-up, following speculation within the Formula One paddock that the team is using the outlawed system.

Red Bull's qualifying pace has prompted talk that the team is using a damping system that lowers the car for faster qualifying runs before being raised again for the race.

It is claimed this the set-up works by using compressed gas to push the car down for qualifying. The gas could then be released overnight to allow the car to run higher to accommodate heavier fuel loads in the race.

See pics from the Malaysian grand prix

However, Red Bull team boss Christian Horner has denied the team is using such a system. The Red Bull RB6 was given the all-clear on Saturday following a thorough inspection from the FIA, and the team has said it will protest any rivals that run such as system, following claims McLaren was set to introduce its own version for the next round in China.

“We haven't got one, it is as simple as that,” said Horner. “If McLaren have one in China we will protest them, because theoretically they are illegal. The FIA had a good look at our car [in Malaysia] on Saturday night and they are happy with it. They will struggle to find anything because there simply isn't anything there."

Red Bull claimed a one–two at the Malaysian grand prix on Sunday; Sebastian Vettel beat pole-sitter Mark Webber into the first corner and led the race from that point onwards.

Results from the Malaysian grand prix

1. Vettel Red Bull-Renault2. Webber Red Bull-Renault +4.8s3. Rosberg Mercedes +13.5s4. Kubica Renault +18.5s5. Sutil Force India-Mercedes +21.0s6. Hamilton McLaren-Mercedes +23.4s7. Massa Ferrari +27.0s8. Button McLaren-Mercedes +37.9s9. Alguersuari Toro Rosso-Ferrari +1m10.6s10. Hulkenberg Williams +1m13.3s11. Buemi Toro Rosso-Ferrari +1m18.9s12. Barrichello Williams-Cosworth +1 lap13. Alonso Ferrari +2 laps14. Di Grassi Virgin-Cosworth +3 laps15. Chandhok Hispania-Cosworth +3 laps16. Senna Hispania-Cosworth +4 laps17. Trulli Lotus-Cosworth +5 laps

Not classified/retirements:

Kovalainen Lotus-Cosworth 46 lapsPetrov Renault 32 lapsLiuzzi Force India-Mercedes 12 lapsSchumacher Mercedes 9 lapsKobayashi Sauber-Ferrari 8 lapsGlock Virgin-Cosworth 2 lapsDe la Rosa Sauber-Ferrari 0 laps

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Comments
5

6 April 2010

Perhaps a fan of F1 can explain at this point where is the enjoyment to be had in this sort of technical to-ing and fro-ing, and why is it that those active in F1 so often attempt to overturn a win on the track by resorting to the courts?

6 April 2010

[quote Jeezitsonlyacar]Perhaps a fan of F1 can explain at this point where is the enjoyment to be had in this sort of technical to-ing and fro-ing, and why is it that those active in F1 so often attempt to overturn a win on the track by resorting to the courts?[/quote]

well put, I think the F.I.A should give everyone a base car so it would be about the drivers more

6 April 2010

[quote Jeezitsonlyacar]Perhaps a fan of F1 can explain at this point where is the enjoyment to be had in this sort of technical to-ing and fro-ing, and why is it that those active in F1 so often attempt to overturn a win on the track by resorting to the courts?[/quote]

Are you Ernie the Premium Bonds computer got in here again?

You said that a minute ago somewhere else, Ernie.

I worry that this stupidity (or prolery as hinted at by another subject) will have and has had an effect on decision making.

If you create your so-called 'base' car, what will happen with the regulation of this genius invention - the 'base' car? Will infringement just be blithely overlooked in the interest of your vague and dribbling engagement?

6 April 2010

Prolery? Do we think there's another DAFTA on its way? For coining new words, I mean.

6 April 2010

Getting back to the point, how does Red Bull do it?

It's actually quite simple, beautifully simple that you simply won't believe until you see it. McLaren's system is going to be quite complex by comparison, they're engineering something that they don't quite understand yet. But their F-duct is a superb diversion, it doesn't really work!

Anyway, that's one of the joys of following F1 - the technology.

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