In some ways, but clearly not all, the Corsa exudes an air of maturity that will enhance its appeal in the eyes of those who found the previous version too ‘boy racer’. Pitched against the Fiesta, Polo and Ibiza, all of which are shadowed by the Corsa’s £15,550 starting price, it also holds its own in terms of ergonomics and equipment. That alone represents a move upmarket for a car that was pretty plainly value positioned in its previous model generation.

Even basic SE trim includes a 7.0in touchscreen system, cruise control and lane departure warning, but above it sit SRi (it adds parking sensors), Elite Nav (auto lights and wipers, heated seats) and Ultimate, which includes the larger, 10.0in touchscreen, matrix headlights and adaptive cruise. Confusingly, there are further equipment packs – Nav, Premium and Nav Premium – that group together more options. Bottom line: get to know all the specifications to avoid paying for kit you’ll never need.

A top-spec Corsa isn’t expected to perform quite as strongly as Ford Fiesta or VW Polo when it comes to residual values

Low CO2 figures are likely to make the Corsa a temptingly cheap-to-run proposition, although PCP deals are unlikely to be quite as generous as before in an effort to preserve residual values. At 51.8mpg, touring economy as tested proved reasonable if not exceptional. The equivalent Clio managed 56.9mpg.

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