From £17,9359
The Seat Ateca 1.4 TSI 150 makes perfect sense: it's spacious, tidy to drive for an SUV and cheap to run

Our Verdict

Seat Ateca

Can Seat’s first SUV impress, even with the heavy burden of expectation?

20 September 2016

What is it?

The Spanish town of Ateca has only 2000 residents, so it’s on the small side. It also implies that some thought has gone into naming this Seat Ateca 1.4 TSI 150 that shares its name.  

Seat's Ateca is a small SUV, you see, in the same mould as rivals such as the Nissan Qashqai and Kia Sportage. Yet don’t let that fool you into believing that this isn’t a roomy family car, because it is.

For many, diesel would normally be the default engine choice in a car like this, but the 1.4-litre petrol looks like an interesting alternative. Firstly, it develops a very worthy 148bhp, so it’ll crack 0-62mph in 8.5sec, which is considerably quicker than the slightly more expensive 1.6 TDI version. Secondly, with cylinder-on-demand tech that on light throttle lets it run on two cylinders, it’s also pleasingly efficient. So much so, in fact, that it incurs less company car tax than the diesel. 

What's it like?

This engine feels like the perfect fit, performance wise. You can ride the swell of torque that builds from 1500rpm onwards when you wish for relaxed progress, or it’ll happily sing out to 6000rpm when you need to put on a spurt. It sounds good, too: slightly gravelly but never grumbly or coarse. 

It’s only available with a six-speed manual gearbox, but unless you are absolutely wedded to the idea of an auto, you won’t mind. The shift action is slick and the clutch is light and positive; throw in the progressive brakes and there’s a welcome fluidity to it even in snarled-up traffic.

That said, in free-flowing traffic you are aware of some wind and road noise (the latter most notably on 19in wheels), but then you could say the same about any of its rivals. All in all, then, the Ateca is a pretty relaxing motorway cohort.

But why sit on the motorway when Seat has done such a fine job of making its new baby scoot through corners? It’s no hot hatch, true, but compared with the current crop of reasonably priced small SUVs, the Ateca is quite a twinkle toes. The front end will change direction with zeal, helped by the rack’s accurate gearing and intuitive build up of weight as you pile on lock. Ultimate feel through the rim, however, is not great, but then looking at the class as a whole, we weren’t really expecting it to be.

It’s not just the tidy front end that impresses, though. The spring and damper rates feel nicely honed, so instead of demonstrating the usual SUV trait of bucking like a bronco over crests and dips, the Ateca stays on a tight leash. It’s a similar theme through any roundabout or bend taken with vigour; despite its height, the Ateca doesn’t lurch like a weeping willow caught by a hefty gust. 

There is, of course, payback for this: the ride is firm. With 17in wheels the Ateca deals with lighter surface undulations admirably well but, inevitably, jolts over larger, sharper-edged intrusions. However, avoid the optional 19in wheels, which really exacerbate the problem, and it’s an acceptable compromise, we think. 

Inside it’s basically a Seat Leon with a better view out. It’s not the most imaginative looking piece of interior design but it is easy to use. The upper materials look and feel pleasantly squidgy; lower down that plushness gives way to harder, scratchier plastics. Still, at this price point that’s not uncommon.

Up front there’s not much to whinge about concerning the driving position. The steering wheel and seats have a big enough range of movement – including driver and passenger seat height and lumbar adjustment – to adapt to different body shapes. There’s plenty of head and leg room, too.

Rear seat passengers shouldn’t whinge, either. For two tall adults there’s ample leg room, while the head room offered is impressive - only extreme headgear extravagance of the kind seen on Lady’s Day at Ascot might show up a weakness. And you can fit three across the rear bench in reasonable comfort, providing your trio accepts some shoulder rubbing. In fact, the only real flaw is that there’s no sliding or reclining rear bench like you find in a Volkswagen Tiguan; then again, the Ateca is a much cheaper option than its VW Group stablemate.

The boot is bang on the money for the class. It’s a fraction bigger than a Qashqai’s, so you’ll have no problems throwing in a couple of large suitcases or fold-up prams, but do go for the optional dual-height boot floor, which lets you separate out delicate items and reduces the step left when you fold down the rear seats.

Should I buy one?

Absolutely. The Ateca is as good as it gets for the class: practical and with a fine blend of ride and handling.

And what about the petrol versus diesel debate? Well, we’re road testing the 1.6 TDI diesel soon, but if you think you have even the merest hint of dieselphobia, pick this 1.4 TSI 150. It’s cheaper on company car tax and offers way more performance. Just bear in mind that it won’t quite match the diesel’s average fuel economy if you're doing lots of miles.

Seat Ateca 1.4 TSI 150 SE

Location Manchester; On sale now; Price £21,015; Engine 4 cyls, 1395cc, turbocharged, petrol; Power 148bhp at 5000-6000rpm Torque 184lb ft at 1500-3500rpm; Gearbox 6-spd manual; Kerb weight 1349kg; Top speed 125mph; 0-62mph 8.5sec; Economy 53.3mpg (combined); CO2/tax band 122g/km, 21%; Rivals Nissan Qashqai Kia Sportage

Join the debate

Comments
19

20 September 2016
Lol, how many Alteca reviews are we going to get? Is Alteca going to get the Vauxhall Astra treatment on Autocar now? Looking forward to Cropleys infomericals and Holdens sycophantic pandering to the imaginary inhabitants of a parallel universe in which smartphones don't exist.

20 September 2016
winniethewoo wrote:

Lol, how many Alteca reviews are we going to get? Is Alteca going to get the Vauxhall Astra treatment on Autocar now? Looking forward to Cropleys infomericals and Holdens sycophantic pandering to the imaginary inhabitants of a parallel universe in which smartphones don't exist.

Shut up troll! Some of us are interested in the different model variants.

20 September 2016
Nice to see the VW PR department getting back into full swing....yawnnnnn.

20 September 2016
Lightningduck wrote:

Nice to see the VW PR department getting back into full swing....yawnnnnn.

And another troll. If you arent interested STFU and leave the reviews to those who are.

20 September 2016
centenary wrote:

And another troll. If you arent interested STFU and leave the reviews to those who are.

Tsk... you'll get a ticking off from the Seat PR manager for that. You're supposed to counter negative comments but not hurl abuse :-;

20 September 2016
Punchy petrol engine, real world probably 40mpg+ and sensibly priced. Seat really do seemed to have got the Ateca right and whilst it may not be exciting, it does seem to do the everyday things very well.

20 September 2016
Why does Autocar repeat itself by mentioning the size of the boot and mention things like driving position; range of movement of driving wheel; plenty of head and leg room, the size of the rear bench etc when testing each engine option on the Ateca? It's the same for every car!

What readers are interested in between these different engines is a comparison in real-world economy, but once again there's absolutely no mention of it. Why?

These aren't review, they're adverts.

autocar wrote:

Just bear in mind that it won’t quite match the diesel’s average fuel economy if you're doing lots of miles.

What's that supposed to mean? Average fuel economy has nothing whatsoever to do with the amount of mileage you cover. The 1.4tsi won't match the 1.6tdi whether it be over 50 miles or 50,000 miles.

21 September 2016
You are quite right Scotty5. I have an Audi Q3 with this engine and its averaging 43.6 mpg over 7500 miles (according to the onboard computer) whereas my Merc C-Class 220 CDI used to average well over 50 mpg and that was going a lot quicker. My record for a run is 55.4 mpg - again according to the computer - froa trip from Stockport to the southwest - but I had to drive carefully. The gearing on the 1.4 engine is low. So although the engine is quiet in town it's a bit noisier on the motorway - subjectively louder than the Merc diesel at motorway speeds.

db

20 September 2016
This has a lot in common with all other VW products at the moment and with my fridge and washing machine. They too do everything efficiently in a lovely shade of white but I never look back at them as I walk away and go wow. Seat is supposed to have auto emotion at its heart I certainly don't see any here!

20 September 2016
How's this for a test, get the more expensive, noisier, slower, more polluting, rougher diesel version and test the 2 side by side for the day and publish the results. Can you guess what my money's on, ps I don't care about a few hundred quid on a privately purchased £22,000 car

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

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