An exhaustive introduction to the Ferrari FF is likely to be superfluous to even the most casual Ferrari fan so we’ll only pause for a brief recap before getting to the nitty gritty.

Launched in 2011 as a replacement for the Ferrari 612, the shooting brake-styled four-seater offered buyers a first: a full-size Grand Tourer with a 651bhp V12 engine and, somewhat contentiously, four-wheel drive.

Dubbed FF for its four seats and four-wheel drive, the car was designed by Pininfarina under the direction of Ferrari’s own chief designer, Flavio Manzoni.

Maranello had previously dabbled with four driven wheels in the 1987 408 Integrale concept, but the V12-engined FF is the first Ferrari to make series production with such a system.

Most initial assessment of the FF when it was launched was at least partially concerned with the question of identity; can this generously proportioned four-wheel-drive estate car really be considered worthy of the emblem plastered on its flanks?

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