From £19,165
Well-specced and refined Citroen comes at a price
23 September 2009

What is it?

Citroën’s top-of-the-range Exclusive trim Tourer fitted with a new 3.0-litre V6 turbodiesel engine. Until now, the most potent engine in Citroën’s current C5 line-up was the 205bhp 2.7-litre V6 diesel available in the Exclusive spec saloon and estate.

That unit has now been replaced with a newer, cleaner, more powerful 3.0-litre unit. It’s not the first time we’ve sampled this motor. The same engine, in either 237bhp or 271bhp form can, or soon will, be found in XF and XJ Jags and the Land Rover Discovery. The C5 gets the engine in 237bhp, 332lb ft form.

What’s it like?

The new engine suits the Tourer exceptionally well. With a 1763kg kerb weight to propel it doesn’t set the world alight but 8.2sec to 60mph isn’t shabby and a claimed top speed of 150mph should be enough for most people

It’s on the motorway and open road where the V6 excels. This is an impressively quiet and refined unit and, mated to a smooth six-speed auto box, makes for an excellent motorway cruiser. An easily achieved 35mpg and CO2 emissions of 195g/km are both quite acceptable for such a strong performer.

Aside from some minor detail changes to the dash design, the C5 is familiar territory. That means handsome looks, a quality interior and decent load space, but rear passengers can suffer for leg room.

The Hydractive 3+ suspension still defines the Citroën’s character and ensures a relaxing drive, although the 19-inch alloys fitted as an option to our test car noticeably compromised the otherwise supple, loping ride.

Should I buy one?

Possibly. The C5 Tourer 3.0 V6 Exclusive is a cracking car and easy to like, but the sticking point is money. Even the basic £28,295 for the V6-equipped Tourer is a lot to ask given the Citroën’s poor residual values.

But the £34,430 for our exceptionally well-equipped test car is into BMW 330D Tourer territory, although the two are very different in character and unlikely to find themselves on the same shopping list. If you want a powerful, relaxed estate, and you haven’t baulked at the price, then the C5 Tourer’s cosseting charm may appeal.

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Comments
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Elendil 22 February 2011

Re: Citroën C5 HDi V6 Estate

Hi all,

Any update on C5 V6 HDi front tyre wear (how many miles do you get on a front set?)

Also what mpg do you get in the real world.

Seriously considering getting one now there are massive discounts on offer.

Maxycat 14 January 2011

Re: Citroën C5 HDi V6 Estate

Dan McNeil wrote:
somebody here mentioned that the Citroen hydropneumatic system was an air system. It's not, and (to the best of my knowledge) never has been. It's an oil based system
Citroens Hydropneumatic suspension is just as it is named. Each wheels movement is connected to a sphere with gas in one half and oil in the other half separated by a diaphragm. The gas is the spring and the oil quantity is varied, computer controlled on latest models, to control ride height, suspension stiffness, etc. The oil pressure is powered by the engine through a pump and accumulator acting as a reservoir. As the wheel tries to rise due to a bump or greater load placed on the car the gas is compressed against the diaphragm. The diaphragm's resistance to deflection by the increased gas pressure is controlled by the quantity of oil in the other side of the sphere. So the suspension stiffness and height is variable and the car can be raised higher to combat rough tracks or standing water.

Straight Six Fan 20 August 2010

Re: Citroën C5 HDi V6 Estate

Dan McNeil v2 wrote:
Lee23404 wrote:
They look good in black. Good luck keeping it clean!
Yes, thanks;) I know what I'm letting myself in for with black, but it suits the car too much. Maybe I can pretend to be the French President's driver in it...

Part of me really hankers after a black C5 estate, with a little French flag on each front wing... mind you, it really is BLOODY HEAVY. What's more, it's well into Mercedes Heckflosse money, and, let's face it, there's nothing like a 60s Merc for mounting little flags on... short of a 1930s Merc, but I'm not that rich nor Nazi-sympathetic!

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