The part-German, part-Gallic design theme continues inside the C5. On the one hand it feels irrepressibly a Citroen product, with its fixed steering wheel hub, with switches, and wand-like gearlever, but on the other hand there is clearly a sense of Teutonic quality to the way the centre console looks, feels and functions.

Items such as the flush-folding air vents and polished aluminium door handles make the C5 look and feel unusually expensive for this class of car. The centre console has a solid, slightly stark but highly functional look and feel to it. We’re not so keen on the instruments, which aren’t especially easy to read at a glance.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Editor-at-large
We’d like bigger horn buttons. They don't rotate with the wheel, which is a virtue, but you still can't find them.

The C5 is a big car, outside, so you'd expect a generous interior. Space is never an issue up front; the seats in the VTR+ version are excellent, adjusting in all directions at the press of various buttons. But in the back, although legroom is vast, headroom is not especially impressive. It’s obvious that the designers’ desire to create a good-looking car has come at the expense of a couple of inches of rear headroom. Still, the boot is enormous at 533 litres, and that’s including a full-size spare wheel beneath the floor.

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Equipment levels are so generous that it’s hard to think of what else Citroën could provide for the C5 driver. As standard you get climate control, electric seats, a high-grade CD player and a sophisticated computer. Options range from sat-nav to a back massager for the truly committed motorway warrior.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week