Citroën's key objective with its C5 Mondeo-chaser is to identify what makes German designed cars so successful, and emulate it. In this, they've been quite successful. The car is mechanically related to the C6, a considerably more expensive car, which is a good place to start.

At the time of the C5’s launch, Citroën claimed its then-new Mondeo rival was “Reassuringly German. Unmistakably Citroën.” Considering how deliberately French Citroën has always been over the years, it’s surprising and — and for some a little disappointing — to discover so much influence from Germany’s premium marques within the genes of the all-new C5.

Look closely and you can detect Germanness in most aspects of the car. Not merely in its admittedly handsome looks but also in its marketing thrust, its interior… you name it, the C5 oozes German-ness.

The C5 is a good looking car in a traditional, square-jawed kind of way and, at first glance, appears to be extremely well built, decently equipped and very obviously more premium in feel than its predecessor.

First drives

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

  • McLaren 720S
    Car review
    26 May 2017
    This is the first of McLaren’s new generation of cars — and what a way to begin it is
  • Suzuki Swift
    Car review
    26 May 2017
    Suzuki’s best-selling supermini returns in a new guise and with mild hybrid tech
  • Renault Captur
    First Drive
    22 May 2017
    Renault's big-selling compact crossover gets a mild cosmetic facelift
  • First Drive
    22 May 2017
    The hardcore track-focused Performante has active aerodynamics and more power than the standard Huracán - so, does it unlock the supercar's full potential?
  • Abarth 595 Trofeo review
    First Drive
    19 May 2017
    The 158bhp, 169lb ft 1.4 T-Jet Turbo engine delivers sudden bursts of urgent, energetic driving - but can it be too much sometimes?