Here’s something that doesn’t happen often: after driving BMW's GT for the first time, a couple of our testers said they got out to check that the car was on runflat tyres (it is), so normal is the ride. Not pampering, not cosseting, not a major comfort breakthrough. Just completely acceptable. Pliant.

To drive, then, the GT is pretty pleasing. It rides with suppleness and general quietness from its suspension, despite that vast rear hatch, which means there’s no solid bulkhead as there is in a 3 Series saloon.

Matt Prior

Matt Prior

Editor-at-large
Switch off the DSC in the wet and you'll have an entertaining driving experience

The hatch brings with it something else, especially given that it’s electrically operated: the motors add so much weight that 53 per cent of the car’s mass sits over the back wheels. 

Does that matter? On the road, not at all. We suspect it’s the reason why the GT comes with wider tyres on the rear than the front (255-section versus 225), to maintain a neutral handling balance. The 320d saloon and 330d Touring we’ve previously tested wore the same boots front and rear. 

So, the 3 Series GT just steers and handles with much the same feel as other 3 Series. There’s a touch less agility, perhaps, but with a fine smoothness to the rack, decent body control and well judged roll and pitch movements. It’s not quite as balanced as a 3 Series saloon, but it’s close.

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week

Opting for the M Sport adaptive dampers could be a worthwhile move if you want the best from your GT, as they give a real suppleness to the ride and help partly mask the GT’s greater heft over the saloon, especially when confronted with more potted surfaces.

But this good work can be undone if you put it in Sport mode; here the bumps can intrude into the cabin, so it’s best to enjoy the ride in its standard mode for most of the time.

Save money on your car insurance

Compare quotesCompare insurance quotes

Find an Autocar car review

Driven this week