Undisguised pics of the 2012 Nissan GT-R at the Nürburgring
1 October 2010

Nissan has revealed its new GT-R to a private audience at the Paris motor show.

The car, set to go into production in 2012, was only shown to selected VIPs.

See the pics of Nissan GT-R at the Paris motor show

The car was spotted undisguised at a very wet and foggy Nürburgring, earlier this week and the spy pictures revealed the addition of new LED lights at the front and revised styling to front and rear bumper designs.

The GT-R is also understood to have undergone a rigorous weight-saving programme to ensure the latest model tips the scales at 30 kilos lighter than the current car.

See the undisguised pics of the revised Nissan GT-R at the 'Ring

Read more on Nissan's luxury GT-R 'Egoist'

Thanks to modified turbos, oil cooler and exhaust system, the GT-R’s twin-turbo V6 now pumps out 506bhp at 6400rpm and produces 448lb ft of torque between 3200 and 5200rpm.

There are also tweaked gear ratios, while completing the changes are revised spring rates and rear suspension geometry – which should help deliver a more compliant ride with sharper handling.

See all the latest Nissan GT-R reviews, news and video

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Comments
16

29 September 2010

I am a big fan of the R34 Skyline GT-R, but can not like this ugly, soulless beast...

29 September 2010

Rigorous weight saving equates to 30kg???! I could remove my shoes to lose more weight than that. But anyway I thought the lead engineer stated that the GTR was made that weight to deliberately improve driving dynamics as it was not ideal to use aero to generate the same amount in downforce? So this is essentially akin to them removing 30kgs of downforce??

29 September 2010

[quote eXceed]Rigorous weight saving equates to 30kg???! I could remove my shoes to lose more weight than that.[/quote]

I sure hope that's hyperbole and not you struggling with the metric system. A two-stone shoe on each foot would be a bit of a struggle... ;-)

29 September 2010

I was being sardonic, I do know roughly how much a shoe weighs ha :D

29 September 2010

You don't seem to know what downforce is, unless you were making a joke?

Reducing the weight by 30kgs will actually increase the down force benefit, not take it away.

Say your taking a corner at 70mph with the same level as downforce as before but with 30kgs less mass to influence, the car will stick even better to the road as less mass is working against the downforce.

29 September 2010

That's chavtastic !

29 September 2010

Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss...

[quote eXceed]I thought the lead engineer stated that the GTR was made that weight to deliberately improve driving dynamics as it was not ideal to use aero to generate the same amount in downforce? So this is essentially akin to them removing 30kgs of downforce??
[/quote]

Well using aero to add 30kg of downforce (aka weight) for stickier cornering only works at speed. Losing 30kg of actual weight benefits you in other ways all the time, so adding it back in with aero (but only when you need it) seems like a good idea. Guess that's why the racing boys do it. Maybe they now need 60kg of downforce to stay where they were...

29 September 2010

[quote MHanna]Maybe they now need 60kg of downforce to stay where they were...[/quote]

Removal of weight effectively gains you extra downforce performance from the existing aero downforce you have.

For example if you have a 100kg car with 51kgs of aero downforce. If you lower its weight by 50kgs to end up with a 50kgs kerb weight then the existing 51kgs of aero downforce will be twice as effective making the car able to drive upside down, when before it was nowhere near as effective.

Aero weight lets you go around corners, car weight throws you into the wall it doesnt help you get around corners.

Forgive me if you were joking, i wasn't sure.

30 September 2010

[quote iploss]Aero weight lets you go around corners, car weight throws you into the wall it doesnt help you get around corners.

Forgive me if you were joking, i wasn't sure.[/quote]

Not entirely. My understanding of the physics is as follows: The grip of a car in a corner (i.e. centripetal force in the direction of the centre of the circle the car is turning around) is a function of the weight of the car (vertical force) times the coefficient of friction between the tyres and the road surface. It doesn't really matter whether this weight comes from the materials of the car or the aero force pushing it down, the contact patches don't know and don't care. The only thing that matters is that there's enough contact patch to transmit all the sideways force to the road and make the car turn. Otherwise you break traction and slide.

A theoretical 1000kg "base car" designed to have zero aero effects at any speed weighs the same as a 500kg car with 500kg of downforce on it at 100mph (I'm just picking easy numbers for the example) and will corner just as hard at the same 100mph, all else being equal, like tyres for example. At 50mph the 500kg car may only have 100kg of downforce so at 50mph it'll weigh 600kg and actually not corner as hard as the 1000kg base car. But at 150mph it might have 1500kg of downforce on it so now it weighs 2000kg and will corner harder than the base car. That's why an F1 car can take a given corner at high speed but not when going maybe half the speed (again, all else being equal - tyre temp will affect the coefficient of friction) or why it can theoretically drive on the ceiling. In the oh-so-realistic example the 500kg car would have a net weight of 1000kg upwards towards the ceiling at 150mph. Is the same downforce more "effective" if the car is lighter? Well I see what you mean - it requires less downforce to overcome the actual mass of the car - the 500kg car would be able to drive on the roof at 150mph but a 1500kg car that generated the same 1500kg of downforce would not.

Back to the GT-R. Losing weight, even 30kg, is beneficial because it's less weight to be accelerated and braked, making the car (slightly) faster to accelerate and potentially more fuel efficient (if you don't). But the centripetal force at a 100mph cornering speed will be slightly smaller, making the car corner slightly less well. Not so much that you'd notice though, even at 100mph. Real world (as opposed to F1) levels of downforce are really low. So where I was going with my comment was that if they're taking 30kg of physical weight out then to keep the cornering speed the same (at 100mph say) they may need to add an extra 30kg of downforce to make up for it. The contact patches will then feel the same force on them and transmit the same centripetal force to the road. Downforce at normal road speeds in normal road cars basically doesn't exist though, so cutting physical weight is a good thing to do. The small percentage drop in cornering grip isn't going to make anybody fall off the road...

I know this is highly simplistic and there are all kinds of other variables involved - "all else being equal" must be kept in mind. I'd love to hear a comment by somebody who actually does this stuff for a living!

30 September 2010

I hope you've got a big black-board and a lot of chalk left: you've forgotten the centrifugal force. Ooops... Everyone should instinctively "do this stuff for a living", even more so to stay alive, every time they go to drive round a bend.

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