The new Volvo XC90 SUV, which is due to be revealed in August, will come packed with new safety tech including an advanced park assist package and accident detection

Volvo claims the all-new XC90 SUV - which is due to go on sale later this year - will be one of the safest vehicles ever made. Among the new model's standard safety systems will be two claimed world-first technologies, including new accident avoidance and junction braking systems.

The expanded safety tech is part the firm's plan that nobody will die or be seriously injured in a new Volvo car by 2020.

Key among the XC90's safety features is a new system for protecting cars which have been forced off the road in accidents - something Volvo claims is a world first. 

The system, dubbed Safe Positioning, combines pre-tensioning the front seat belts if a crash is detected with using an energy-absorbing seat to minimise spinal injuries. 

A lane departure warning system can also apply torque to the steering wheel, while a driver alert system detects if motorists aren't paying attention and directs them to the nearest rest stop.

Another technology which Volvo claims is a world first is its junction braking system. If the XC90 detects that a rear impact by a vehicle at a junction is imminent, it pre-tensions the seat belts, as well as activating lights to warn the driver behind. The system also protects against turning into the path of an oncoming car. Volvo says its seats use the next generation of whiplash protection technology to prevent injuries.

Meanwhile, a roll-over prevention system can apply braking force to wheels and restrict engine torque if the vehicle is in danger of rolling over. A new Queue Assist can also allow the car to take over autonomous acceleration, braking and steering when manouvering in a slow-moving queue. City braking, road sign recognition and blind spot monitoring systems also feature. 

Buyers will also be able to specify a new suite of assistance technologies dubbed IntelliSafe. An extended parking assist function can guide motorists into parking bays while monitoring the area around the car for traffic, while a 360-degree view is presented to the driver inside.

The Safe Positioning, lane assist, driver alert, junction braking, city braking and road sign recognition systems have already been confirmed as standard equipment on the new car, although Volvo won't reveal exact specification or pricing information until closer to its launch.

The company has already revealed the powertrain options which will be available when the new XC90 goes on sale. Offered from the outset will be a T8-badged petrol-electric hybrid as well as D5 and D4 diesel options.

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Our Verdict

Volvo XC90 2003-2014

The Volvo XC90 is a big seven seat SUV in desperate need of modernisation, despite still having some strengths

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Comments
16

22 July 2014
I am sorry but that is a ridiculous claim.

No vehicle can prevent that. If an articulated lorry lost control beside a Volvo or any car for that matter it would be carnage.

I drive regularly on the M25/M40 and have seen terrible accidents which are down to drivers not concentrating, falling asleep at the wheel or simply not driving in accordance to the road conditions.

22 July 2014
It's a plan and not a claim which has been done in conjunction with the Swedish government. It can never be a claim as people just die all the time without having an accident. For me this marketing angle works and plays on their historical reputation it makes me want one and I don't even know what it looks likes or drives like.

22 July 2014
"A new Queue Assist can also allow the car to take over autonomous acceleration, braking and steering when manouvering in a slow-moving queue."

Not exactly a safety feature per se, but a brilliant idea nontheless. Anything that completely removes the effort needed for the single most hateful aspect of driving will get the nod from me.

22 July 2014
Looks to me as if the car is taking control of the driver.
Who is going to take responsibility in the event of one of these cars steering you straight to the scene of the accident?
Personally I prefer the driver making the decisions not the car but thats just me.

 Offence can only be taken not given- so give it back!

22 July 2014
"A new Queue Assist can also allow the car to take over autonomous acceleration, braking and steering ."
Other than various parking assists, and I'm not sure about them, is this the first car that can control the accelerater and steering in moving trafiic??? is there any legal constraints???

 

Hydrogen cars just went POP

22 July 2014
xxxx wrote:

"A new Queue Assist can also allow the car to take over autonomous acceleration, braking and steering ."
Other than various parking assists, and I'm not sure about them, is this the first car that can control the accelerater and steering in moving trafiic??? is there any legal constraints???

Actually the Merc E- and S-Classes can already do this, although they call virtually all their systems 'Assistant Systems' so as to highlight the fact that they merely assist the driver...that is, in an accident the human being behind the wheel would still be responsible.

Autocar wrote:

"Another technology which Volvo claims is a world first is its junction braking system. If the XC90 detects that a rear impact by a vehicle at a junction is imminent, it pre-tensions the seat belts, as well as activating lights to warn the driver behind. "

Actually Merc already has a system in the S-Class which is able to detect an imminent rear impact, where the rear lights flash to warn the oncoming driver and if the car is stationary the brake pressure is increased to reduce whiplash and any risks of secondary collisions...

 

- Follow your own star -

22 July 2014
Think I'll take the bus.

22 July 2014
Unfortunately all these systems will just produce more drivers that think they can just rely on their car, and that they themselves don't really have to concentrate at all, or be aware of what is going on around them.

22 July 2014
All these safety systems are primarily about overcoming human error or mitigating the consequences of it. So why not just make a driverless version and be done with it?

And that way Volvo could also save on all the engineering required to make their cars 'fun' or 'involving' to drive. Which they're not so focused on anyway.

22 July 2014
'Volvo tries to implant 1970s old wives tale back into peoples minds in last ditch attempt to revive flagging sales !'

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