Swedish firm says the imposed limit will be a key part of its ambition to ensure nobody is killed or injured in a new Volvo from 2020 on

Volvo will limit the top speed of all of its cars to 112mph (180km/h) from 2020. The move is motivated by the company's intention that no one should be killed or seriously injured in a new Volvo by that date, the Swedish car maker said.

In a statement, Volvo said that “technology alone will not get it all the way to zero”, adding that the firm “is now broadening its scope to include a focus on driver behaviour”. The limit will apply to all cars made from mid-2020 onwards and going on sale in 2021.

Volvo referenced the limitations of technology to prevent accidents and injuries above certain speeds, citing data from the US National Highway and Traffic Safety Administration showing that 25% of road fatalities in the US in 2017 were a result of speeding.

“Volvo is a leader in safety. We always have been and we always will be,” said Volvo boss Håkan Samuelsson. "Because of our research, we know where the problem areas are when it comes to ending serious injuries and fatalities in our cars. And while a speed limitation is not a cure-all, it’s worth doing if we can even save one life. Speed kills, and there is no reason to go beyond 112mph."

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"Volvo is not a car for those who are boy racers. Our value is for people who want to protect what’s important further. We will get some questions and critics for this, but we’re sure we will gain more customers than we will lose."

The top speeds of Volvo's current models range from 118mph to 155mph. 

Samuelsson said the 112mph figure had been chosen because it stille exceeded the regulations in virtually every country, bar limited stretches of the autobahn in Germany. "We decided that 112mph is the limit of what more people want to do," he said. "Outside Germany, it’s seen as a high speed. It was a process of balance: we didn’t want to scare anybody who was thinking of buying a Volvo by putting it too low. But this is a limit where nobody should need a faster car."

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Samuelsson added that he hoped the move would spark an industry debate over speeds: "It’s logical to start with a brand that has safety as a core value. Let’s see how other car brands react. We are making a statement. Speed kills, and we need to encourage limitations."

Cutting top speeds could have other benefits for Volvo, too: it is likely to help reduce engine emissions, and can be beneficial for improving the range of electric cars.

Volvo is also investigating geo-fencing technology to see if it could further limit the speeds of its cars in sensitive areas, such as near schools.

“We want to start a conversation about whether car makers have the right or maybe even an obligation to install technology in cars that changes their driver’s behaviour, to tackle things like speeding, intoxication or distraction,” said Samuelsson. “We don’t have a firm answer to this question but believe we should take leadership in the discussion and be a pioneer.”

Volvo safety expert Jan Ivarsson said:  “As humans, we all understand the dangers with snakes, spiders and heights. With speeds, not so much. People often drive too fast in a given traffic situation and have poor speed adaption in relation to that traffic situation and their own capabilities as a driver. We need to support better behaviour and help people realise and understand that speeding is dangerous.”

The firm has also highlighted two other external factors that contribute to fatalities: intoxication and distraction. It is looking at ways to reduce both and is expected to make further safety-related announcements at an event on the subject it is holding later this month.

Samuellson noted that the introduction of the 112mph limit would only apply to Volvo cars, and not those from Geely sister brands Polestar and Lynk & Co.

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Comments
38

4 March 2019

Why???!!!

I can't see any point in this... stupid decision!!!

4 March 2019
Jack Daniels wrote:

Why???!!!

I can't see any point in this... stupid decision!!!

 

LMFAO Do old people drive above 70mph let alone 112?

4 March 2019

I'm afraid volvo, there may come a point when the car is only as good as the driver.

4 March 2019

Despite the great ambitions of Volvo to have a car in which no one will be killed in, this aim to limit all cars to 112km by 2020 will (im sure) have a negative impact on their sales.

A lot of people buy Volvo cars not only for their luxury and design but also for their speed..... if this idea is going to happen by volvo they will surely have to reduce the prive of their cars..

289

4 March 2019

It was 112mph not kph Denbeigh. And I cant see the point in any car having a greater top speed than that anymore.

I was a speed freak like many others, but in most European countries today why would you need a top speed greater that 100 mph anymore....your speed is increasingly monitored and anyway the sheer amount of traffic means opportunities to acheive such speeds are rare even if you are prepared to risk your driving licence. 

We just need to let it go...those days have gone.

 

4 March 2019
Denbeigh White wrote:

Despite the great ambitions of Volvo to have a car in which no one will be killed in, this aim to limit all cars to 112km by 2020 will (im sure) have a negative impact on their sales.

A lot of people buy Volvo cars not only for their luxury and design but also for their speed..... if this idea is going to happen by volvo they will surely have to reduce the prive of their cars..

 

Somebody buys Volvo's for their "speed"? :-D The funniest comment I have read.

4 March 2019

In acual fact... I dont see how its going to help. You can just as easily be killed at 80 mph.People rarely actually drive above 100 anyway.

4 March 2019

Well said. 

4 March 2019

Volvo seems to be suggesting that there's a chance people might survive an accident at 112mph in their cars. Unless their cars are now designed, engineered and built like a top-level purpose-built racing car we of course all know that the chance of survival at that speed, or indeed above 70mph, in any road car is very low indeed. So what difference 112mph as opposed to, say, 155mph will make, I have no idea apart from the severity of an accident.

4 March 2019

This is just ridiculous, and the geofencing technolofy is going add to the complexities that there already is in Volvo's cars. Imagine if you are driving past a school on a saturday and you had to slow down!! People still want the experience of driving a car naturally:)). Just why?

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